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The introduction of dependent interviewing on the British Household Panel Survey

Author

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  • Jäckle, Annette
  • Laurie, Heather
  • Uhrig, S.C. Noah

Abstract

This paper documents the introduction of dependent interviewing in wave 16 of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). Dependent interviewing is a method of designing questions on longitudinal surveys where substantive information, available to the survey organisation prior to the interview, is used to tailor the wording and routing of questions to the respondent’s situation or to enable in-interview edit checks. The decision to introduce dependent interviewing in the BHPS was motivated by data quality issues and the paper discusses the reasoning behind this decision. A particular aim was to reduce measurement error that leads to cross-wave inconsistencies and hence biases in estimates of change, such as ‘seam effects’ in histories of employment or benefit receipt. The paper provides documentation for BHPS data users and outlines the implications of the changes made when using the data. The paper also provides information about the questionnaire design, testing process and technical aspects of the implementation, for survey practitioners and methodologists who may be considering implementing dependent interviewing on a longitudinal survey.

Suggested Citation

  • Jäckle, Annette & Laurie, Heather & Uhrig, S.C. Noah, 2007. "The introduction of dependent interviewing on the British Household Panel Survey," ISER Working Paper Series 2007-07, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2007-07
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2007-07.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Earnings and Labour Market Volatility in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 7491, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Jenkins, Stephen P., 2020. "Was the mid-2000s drop in the British job change rate genuine or a survey design effect?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 194(C).
    3. Jennifer C. Smith, 2015. "Pay Growth, Fairness, and Job Satisfaction: Implications for Nominal and Real Wage Rigidity," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(3), pages 852-877, July.
    4. Lugtig Peter & Jäckle Annette, 2014. "Can I Just Check...? Effects of Edit Check Questions on Measurement Error and Survey Estimates," Journal of Official Statistics, Sciendo, vol. 30(1), pages 45-62, March.
    5. Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Sala, Emanuela, 2009. "When change matters: the effect of dependent interviewing on survey interaction in the British Household Panel Study," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Sala, Emanuela & Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Lynn, Peter, 2009. ""It is time computers do clever things!" The impact of dependent interviewing on interviewer burden," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-07, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Smith, Jennifer C., 2013. "Pay Growth, Fairness and Job Satisfaction: Implications for Nominal and Real Wage Rigidity," Economic Research Papers 270540, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.

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