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The Europe 2020 Strategy: Can it maintain the EU’s competitiveness in the world?

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  • Gros, Daniel
  • Roth, Felix

Abstract

Launched in March 2010 by the European Commission, the Europe 2020 strategy aims at achieving “smart, sustainable and inclusive” growth. This growth is intended to be driven by three sets of engines: knowledge and innovation, a greener and more efficient use of resources and higher employment combined with social and territorial cohesion. This CEPS report takes an in-depth look at the Europe 2020 strategy and the goals it sets for the EU, with the aim of shedding light on the question of whether the strategy will succeed in fostering the global competitiveness of the European Union. While finding that the Europe 2020 strategy identifies the right key indicators for its targets, the authors advise that it should be revised in several important respects and conclude with relevant policy steps to foster the future capability of European economies and their prosperity.

Suggested Citation

  • Gros, Daniel & Roth, Felix, 2012. "The Europe 2020 Strategy: Can it maintain the EU’s competitiveness in the world?," CEPS Papers 7260, Centre for European Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:eps:cepswp:7260
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    File URL: http://www.ceps.eu/system/files/book/2012/09/Europe%202020.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. André Sapir, 2006. "Globalization and the Reform of European Social Models," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(2), pages 369-390, June.
    2. Bruno Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 2008. "Europe's R&D: Missing the Wrong Targets?," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 43(4), pages 220-225, July.
    3. Bart van Ark & Mary O'Mahoney & Marcel P. Timmer, 2008. "The Productivity Gap between Europe and the United States: Trends and Causes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 25-44, Winter.
    4. Weber, Christopher L. & Peters, Glen P. & Guan, Dabo & Hubacek, Klaus, 2008. "The contribution of Chinese exports to climate change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 3572-3577, September.
    5. van Ark, Bart & Hao, Janet X. & Corrado, Carol & Hulten, Charles, 2009. "Measuring intangible capital and its contribution to economic growth in Europe," EIB Papers 3/2009, European Investment Bank, Economics Department.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fang, Baling & Tan, Yi & Li, Canbing & Cao, Yijia & Liu, Jianguo & Schweizer, Pia-Johanna & Shi, Haiqing & Zhou, Bin & Chen, Hao & Hu, Zhuangli, 2016. "Energy sustainability under the framework of telecoupling," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 253-259.
    2. Felix Roth & Anna-Elisabeth Thum, 2013. "Intangible Capital and Labor Productivity Growth: Panel Evidence for the EU from 1998–2005," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59(3), pages 486-508, September.

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