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Immigrant entrepreneurship in the Netherlands


  • Jan de Kok
  • Milan Jansen
  • Sten Willemsen
  • Judith van Spronsen


Younger people are less often entrepreneur than elder people, just as low-skilled people are less likely to be entrepreneur than high-skilled people. Immigrants from Turkey, Morocco, Suriname and the Dutch Antilles are younger and less educated than native Dutch. These demographical differences partially explain the low rates of entrepreneurship for immigrants from Morocco, Suriname and the Dutch Antilles. However, demography does not explain everything, as is indicated by the fact that the rate of entrepreneurship for immigrants from Turkey is comparable to that of the native Dutch population. It appears as if the demographical 'disadvantage' of these immigrants is compensated by their positive valuation of entrepreneurship.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan de Kok & Milan Jansen & Sten Willemsen & Judith van Spronsen, 2003. "Immigrant entrepreneurship in the Netherlands," Scales Research Reports H200304, EIM Business and Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eim:papers:h200304

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Masurel, E. & Nijkamp, P., 2009. "The low participation of urban migrant entrepreneurs: reasons and perceptions of weak institutional embeddedness," Serie Research Memoranda 0040, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.

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