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Creative industries from an evolutionary perspective: A critical literature review

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  • Su-Hyun Berg

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  • Robert Hassink

Abstract

Although creative industries have been popular as a research topic among social scientists from various backgrounds, most studies lack an evolutionary, history informed perspective. Since we regard this as an important deficit, we explore whether the notions of evolutionary economic geography can contribute to analyzing and explaining the spatial dynamics of creative industries, which has not been done yet in a systematic way. We conclude that it is particularly co-evolution that could potentially be an important notion to explain the spatial dynamics of creative industries in a comparative perspective.

Suggested Citation

  • Su-Hyun Berg & Robert Hassink, 2013. "Creative industries from an evolutionary perspective: A critical literature review," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1306, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Apr 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1306
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    File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1306.pdf
    File Function: Version April 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ron Boschma & Koen Frenken, 2011. "The emerging empirics of evolutionary economic geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 295-307, March.
    2. Ron A. Boschma & Rik Wenting, 2007. "The spatial evolution of the British automobile industry: Does location matter?," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 213-238, April.
    3. Ron Boschma & Ron Martin (ed.), 2010. "The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 12864.
    4. Sao-Wen Cheng, 2005. "Cultural Goods Production, Cultural Capital Formation and the Provision of Cultural Services," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 119-05, Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht.
    5. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2006. "Path dependence and regional economic evolution," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(4), pages 395-437, August.
    6. Peter E. Earl & Jason Potts, 2004. "The market for preferences," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(4), pages 619-633, July.
    7. Norma M Rantisi & Deborah Leslie & Susan Christopherson, 2006. "Placing the creative economy: scale, politics, and the material," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 38(10), pages 1789-1797, October.
    8. Jan Vang, 2008. "Editorial: Geography and the Cultural Economy," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(5), pages 589-592, September.
    9. Koen Frenken & Frank Van Oort & Thijs Verburg, 2007. "Related Variety, Unrelated Variety and Regional Economic Growth," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 685-697.
    10. Richard E. Caves, 2003. "Contracts Between Art and Commerce," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(2), pages 73-83, Spring.
    11. Ron Boschma & Ron Martin, 2007. "Editorial: Constructing an evolutionary economic geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(5), pages 537-548, September.
    12. Luciana Lazzeretti & Francesco Capone & Rafael Boix, 2011. "Reasons for Clustering of Creative Industries in Italy and Spain," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(8), pages 1243-1262, July.
    13. Sao-Wen Cheng, 2006. "Cultural goods creation, cultural capital formation, provision of cultural services and cultural atmosphere accumulation," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 30(4), pages 263-286, December.
    14. Norma M. Rantisi, 2004. "The Ascendance of New York Fashion," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 86-106, March.
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