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Measuring Poverty in the Pacific

Author

Listed:
  • Matthew Morris

    () (Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public POlicy, The Australian National University)

Abstract

Measuring poverty in the Pacific is important to keep poor people on the policy agenda, to design effective policies and programs and to carry out rigorous evaluation so that we know what works and why. There are various definitions of poverty, ranging from a narrow focus on adequate calorie consumption through to broader concepts of capabilities. This paper takes a practical look at how to measure one conventional indicator of poverty: income (or consumption) poverty. In doing so, the paper highlights both the limitations of household datasets in the Pacific as well as opportunities to make better use of data for poverty analysis. Good progress is being made in improving the quality of household surveys, so the challenge now is to analyse these more fully to inform policies, program design and evaluation.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Morris, 2011. "Measuring Poverty in the Pacific," Development Policy Centre Discussion Papers 1109, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:devpol:1109
    as

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    File URL: http://devpolicy.anu.edu.au/pdf/papers/DP_9_-_Measuring_Poverty_in_the_Pacific.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jonathan Haughton & Shahidur R. Khandker, 2009. "Handbook on Poverty and Inequality," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11985.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Crawford School Working Papers in December 2011
      by David Stern in Stochastic Trend on 2012-01-03 06:04:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Feeny, Simon & McDonald, Lachlan & Posso, Alberto, 2014. "Are Poor People Less Happy? Findings from Melanesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 448-459.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    aid;

    JEL classification:

    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

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