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Regulation of Privatized Utilities: The Chilean Experience

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  • Eduardo Bitrán
  • Pablo Serra

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Abstract

The privatization of Chile's public utilities has led to substantial new investment and improvements in internal efficiency. However, the limited information available to regulators, combined with their insufficient technical capacity, have combined to prevent efficiency increases being fully passed on to consumers in price reductions. In fact, drastic price cuts have occurred only where competition has emerged, so achieving competition wherever possible should be the main policy goal. Competition can be enhanced by either modifying existing regulations, as happened in long-distance telecommunications, or by a more active anti-trust policy. To achieve this, the regulatory institutions clearly need strengthening.

Suggested Citation

  • Eduardo Bitrán & Pablo Serra, 1998. "Regulation of Privatized Utilities: The Chilean Experience," Documentos de Trabajo 32, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:edj:ceauch:32
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kridel, Donald J & Sappington, David E M & Weisman, Dennis L, 1996. "The Effects of Incentive Regulation in the Telecommunications Industry: A Survey," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 269-306, May.
    2. Crew, Michael A & Kleindorfer, Paul R, 1996. "Incentive Regulation in the United Kingdom and the United States: Some Lessons," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 211-225, May.
    3. Bernstein, Sebastian, 1988. "Competition, marginal cost tariffs and spot pricing in the Chilean electric power sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 369-377, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vinnari, Eija M., 2006. "The economic regulation of publicly owned water utilities: The case of Finland," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 158-165, September.
    2. Post, Alison E. & Murillo, María Victoria, 2016. "How Investor Portfolios Shape Regulatory Outcomes: Privatized Infrastructure After Crises," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 328-345.
    3. Zhang, Yinfang & Parker, David & Kirkpatrick, Colin, 2005. "Competition, regulation and privatisation of electricity generation in developing countries: does the sequencing of the reforms matter?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(2-3), pages 358-379, May.
    4. Solanes, Miguel & Jouravlev, Andrei, 2006. "Water governance for development and sustainability," Recursos Naturales e Infraestructura 111, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    5. Manger, Mark, 2008. "International Investment Agreements and Services Markets: Locking in Market Failure?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2456-2469, November.
    6. M. Pollitt, 2004. "Electricity reform in Chile. Lessons for developing countries," Competition and Regulation in Network Industries, Intersentia, vol. 5(3), pages 221-263, September.
    7. Murillo, Maria Victoria & Foulon, Carmen Le, 2006. "Crisis and policymaking in Latin America: The case of Chile's 1998-99 electricity crisis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1580-1596, September.
    8. Gutierrez, Luis H., 2003. "Regulatory governance in the Latin American telecommunications sector," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 225-240, December.

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