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Spatial Distribution of Production and Education


  • Olga Alonso-Villar

    (Dpto. de Economía Aplicada. Universidade de Vigo)


There is no doubt that people like to migrate to large cities because they can acquire a wider range of products and jobs, but also because they can exchange information and ideas in an easier way. In this respect, we will attempt to explain the formation of metropolitan areas through a general equilibrium model in which concentration emerges not only from the interaction between increasing returns to scale at the firm level, transport costs and the mobility of labor, but also from human capital externalities. Our aim is to underline the role of human capital as a factor that fosters both the agglomeration of the economic activity and cities' growth. The paper shows that there is new scope for government activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Olga Alonso-Villar, 2000. "Spatial Distribution of Production and Education," Documentos de trabajo - Analise Economica 0008, IDEGA - Instituto Universitario de Estudios e Desenvolvemento de Galicia.
  • Handle: RePEc:edg:anecon:0008

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    Cited by:

    1. Adolfo Cristobal-Campoamor & Osiris Parcero, 2013. "Behind the Eastern–Western European convergence path: the role of geography and trade liberalization," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(3), pages 871-891, December.
    2. Pasquale Commendatore & Ingrid Kubin & Carmelo Petraglia & Iryna Sushko, 2012. "Economic integration and agglomeration in a customs union in the presence of an outside region," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp146, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    3. Georg Hirte & Christian Leßmann, 2014. "Trade, Integration, and Interregional Inequality," CESifo Working Paper Series 4799, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Dimitris Kallioras & George Petrakos & Maria Tsiapa & Lefteris Topaloglou, 2011. "The Determinants of Growth in EU Border Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa10p702, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Georg Hirte & Christian Lessmann, 2014. "Trade and Interregional Inequality," ERSA conference papers ersa14p304, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Crozet, Matthieu & Koenig Soubeyran, Pamina, 2004. "EU enlargement and the internal geography of countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 265-279, June.
    7. Olga Alonso-Villar, 2001. "Large Metropolises in the Third World: An Explanation," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 38(8), pages 1359-1371, July.
    8. Maria Florencia Granato, 2011. "REGIONAL NEW ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY (refereed paper)," ERSA conference papers ersa10p747, European Regional Science Association.
    9. Joze P. Damijan & Crt Kostevc, 2008. "Trade liberalization and economic geography in transition countries: Can FDI explain the adjustment patterns of regional wages?," LICOS Discussion Papers 22208, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.

    More about this item


    Monopolistic Competition; Agglomeration; Human Capital; Education;

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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