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Seniority Profiles In Unionised Workplaces: Do Unions Still Have The Edge?

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  • Alexandros Zangelidis

Abstract

The focus of this study is to distinguish the different paths seniority earning profiles follow depending on whether the individual is employed in a workplace where trade unions and collective bargaining are present, or not. Within this framework, two propositions are set. In the union sector seniority should be an important determinant of wages, while in the non-union sector productivity, proxied by occupational experience, should have a key role on earning profiles. The empirical analysis verifies both propositions. Seniority earning profiles appear to be steeper in the union sector, while occupational expertise is estimated to have a more significant role in non-union jobs. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd and the Department of Economics, University of Oxford, 2008.
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  • Alexandros Zangelidis, 2004. "Seniority Profiles In Unionised Workplaces: Do Unions Still Have The Edge?," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 48, Royal Economic Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2004:48
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. G. Reza Arabsheibani & Alan Marin, 2001. "Union Membership and the Union Wage Gap in the UK," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 15(2), pages 221-236, June.
    2. Rafael Gomez & Morley Gunderson & Noah Meltz, 2001. "From Playstations to Workstations: Youth Preferences for Unionisation in Canada," CEP Discussion Papers dp0512, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Zangelidis, Alexandros N, 2003. "Profitable Career Paths: Accumulated Skills in Work, Their Degree of Transferability and Wage Premia," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 226, Royal Economic Society.
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    Cited by:

    1. Veliziotis, Michail, 2010. "Trade unions and unpaid overtime in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-43, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Giovanni Sulis, 2014. "Wage Returns to Experience and Tenure for Young Men in Italy," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 61(5), pages 559-588, November.
    3. Paul Hek & Daniel Vuuren, 2011. "Are older workers overpaid? A literature review," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 18(4), pages 436-460, August.
    4. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Panos, Georgios & Zangelidis, Alexandros, 2009. "The Inter-Related Dynamics of Dual Job Holding, Human Capital and Occupational Choice," MPRA Paper 16859, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Williams, Nicolas, 2009. "Seniority, experience, and wages in the UK," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 272-283, June.

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