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Decreasing Marginal Impatience in a Monetary Growth Model

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  • Ken-Ichi Hirose
  • Shinsuke Ikeda

Abstract

Unlike the standard assumption that the degree of impatience, measured by the rate of time preference, is increasing in wealth, empirical studies support that impatience ismarginally decreasing. By introducing decreasing marginal impatience into the neoclassical monetary growth model _ la Sidrauski, we show that (i) consistently with empirical results, an increase in the core rate of inflation reduces capital stocks in a steady state; and that (ii) its long-run welfare cost is larger than predicted with increasing or constant marginal impatience, implying that estimates of the inflation cost which have so far been obtained by assuming constant time preference may be underestimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Ken-Ichi Hirose & Shinsuke Ikeda, 2004. "Decreasing Marginal Impatience in a Monetary Growth Model," ISER Discussion Paper 0622, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:0622
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    File URL: http://www.iser.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/dp/2004/DP0622.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Heijdra, Ben J, 1998. "Fiscal Policy Multipliers: The Role of Monopolistic Competition, Scale Economies, and Intertemporal Substitution in Labour Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(3), pages 659-696, August.
    7. Das, Mausumi, 2003. "Optimal growth with decreasing marginal impatience," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(10), pages 1881-1898, August.
    8. Gary S. Becker & Casey B. Mulligan, 1997. "The Endogenous Determination of Time Preference," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 729-758.
    9. Robert E. Lucas, Jr., 2000. "Inflation and Welfare," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(2), pages 247-274, March.
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    11. Weil, Philippe, 1991. "Is Money Net Wealth?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(1), pages 37-53, February.
    12. Samwick, Andrew A., 1998. "Discount rate heterogeneity and social security reform," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 117-146, October.
    13. Robert B. Barsky & F. Thomas Juster & Miles S. Kimball & Matthew D. Shapiro, 1997. "Preference Parameters and Behavioral Heterogeneity: An Experimental Approach in the Health and Retirement Study," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 537-579.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ken-Ichi Hirose & Shinsuke Ikeda, 2008. "On Decreasing Marginal Impatience," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 59(3), pages 259-274.

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