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The Transition into Work: Specialities for the Hidden Labour Force

  • Elke Holst
  • C. Katharina Spieß

The paper presents a multivariate approach on transitions into work for five non working groups including the unemployed, the Attached, people in education, people doing housework and others. The study is based on ECHP data from 1994 to 1998. It is expected that individuals in the Attached group have significantly higher transition probabilities into work than others outside the labour force although we control for other socio-demographic, economic factors and some macro indicators. Females overall had a lower transition probability into work in all non working groups compared to males. Females in a more conservative country cluster (compared to a less conservative country cluster) had the lowest transition probabilities of all non employed groups. Gender specific differences arose when we took the need to work into account.

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.41893.de/dp428.pdf
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Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin with number 428.

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Length: 28 p.
Date of creation: 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp428
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  1. Blundell, Richard William & Ham, John & Meghir, Costas, 1987. "Unemployment and Female Labour Supply," CEPR Discussion Papers 149, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Odile Chagny & Jörg Döpke & Mathieu Plane & Rainer Schmidt, 2001. "Labour Supply and Labour Force Participation in Europe � A Discussion of Some Recent Developments and Projections," Kiel Working Papers 1049, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  3. Lioba Trabert, 1997. "Verdeckte Arbeitslosigkeit in West- und Ostdeutschland: Die Bedeutung der stillen Reserve," Wirtschaft im Wandel, Halle Institute for Economic Research, vol. 3(1), pages 3-8.
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