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Labor Supply of Married Females in Estonia

Author

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  • Boriss Siliverstovs
  • Dmitri Koulikov

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the labor supply function for married females in Estonia. Particularly, we are interested in determining the elasticities of the weekly supply of hours with respect to hourly wage rates and with respect to nonlabor income. We adopt the two-step estimation procedure. In the first step, we obtain parameter estimates of the self-selection corrected wage equation. At this stage, we document the absence of the sample selection bias in our data as well as the significant negative effect of nonproficiency in the Estonian language on the hourly wage rate. In the second step, the labor supply function is estimated using the Tobit model, where the predictions from the wage equation substitute for the market wage rates for all individuals. We find that the wage elasticity of hours supplied per week is positive (0.53), while at the same time the nonlabor income effect is insignificant.

Suggested Citation

  • Boriss Siliverstovs & Dmitri Koulikov, 2003. "Labor Supply of Married Females in Estonia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 321, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp321
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Blundell, Richard & Ham, John & Meghir, Costas, 1987. "Unemployment and Female Labour Supply," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388a), pages 44-64, Supplemen.
    6. Callan, T. & van Soest, A.H.O., 1994. "Family labour supply and taxes in Ireland," Discussion Paper 1994-26, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    7. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    8. Heckman, James J, 1993. "What Has Been Learned about Labor Supply in the Past Twenty Years?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 116-121, May.
    9. Mroz, Thomas A, 1987. "The Sensitivity of an Empirical Model of Married Women's Hours of Work to Economic and Statistical Assumptions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 765-799, July.
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    13. James Tobin, 1956. "Estimation of Relationships for Limited Dependent Variables," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 3R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    14. Charles Kroncke & Kenneth Smith, 1999. "The wage effects of ethnicity in Estonia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(1), pages 179-199, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karsten Staehr, 2008. "Estimates of employment and welfare effects of personal labour income taxation in a flat-tax country : The case of Estonia," Bank of Estonia Working Papers 2008-03, Bank of Estonia, revised 30 Oct 2008.
    2. Mikek, Peter, 2008. "Alternative monetary policies and fiscal regime in new EU members," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 335-353, December.
    3. Karsten STAEHR, "undated". "Estimates of Employment and Welfare Effects of Labour Income Taxation in a Country with a Flat: the Case of Estonia," EcoMod2008 23800135, EcoMod.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Female Labor Supply; Transition Economics; Estonian Labor Market;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty

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