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Money Injections in a Neoclassical Growth Model

Author

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  • Ertz, Guy

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

  • Portier, Franck

    (CEPREMAP; CREST)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effects and transmission mechanism related to the alternative injection channels - i.e to households versus a financial intermediary - in a neoclassical growth model with reserve requirements and money multiplier effects. The money injected directly to a financial intermediaries is not subject to reserve requirements while deposits are. As suggested in Fuerst [1994], we show that it does matter what injection channel is used as long as reserve requirements on saving deposits are nonzero. However, it matters only for a scale factor and that the transmission mechanism of money are identical. There are no additional tax avoidance effects that would stimulate intermediation when money is injected directly to the financial intermediary. The model allows for the definition of a set of monetary aggregates, from the most narrow (nonborrowed reserves) to the largest (M1). There is therefore a potential room to understand why different aggregates display different cyclical pattern.

Suggested Citation

  • Ertz, Guy & Portier, Franck, 1998. "Money Injections in a Neoclassical Growth Model," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 1998018, Universit√© catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:1998018
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    File URL: http://sites.uclouvain.be/econ/DP/IRES/9818.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stockman, Alan C., 1981. "Anticipated inflation and the capital stock in a cash in-advance economy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 387-393.
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    3. King, Robert G & Watson, Mark W, 1996. "Money, Prices, Interest Rates and the Business Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 35-53, February.
    4. Chari, V V & Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin, 1995. "Inside Money, Outside Money, and Short-Term Interest Rates," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 1354-1386, November.
    5. Hartley, Peter R, 1988. "The Liquidity Services of Money," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 29(1), pages 1-24, February.
    6. Englund, Peter & Svensson, Lars E O, 1988. "Money and Banking in a Cash-in-Advance Economy," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 29(4), pages 681-705, November.
    7. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1982. "Time to Build and Aggregate Fluctuations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(6), pages 1345-1370, November.
    8. L. Wade, 1988. "Review," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 99-100, July.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1990. "Liquidity and interest rates," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 237-264, April.
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    11. Fuerst, Timothy S., 1992. "Liquidity, loanable funds, and real activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 3-24, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business Cycle; Financial Intermediation; Money Multiplier;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers

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