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Social Security and the Joint Trends in Labor Supply and Benefits Receipt Among Older Men

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  • Bo MacInnis

Abstract

Using data from the Current Population Surveys, we find an increase in the fraction of older American men who worked without receiving Social Security retirement benefits and a decline in the fraction of men who claimed benefits without working during the period 1980-2006. Using bivariate probit regressions, we find that an increase in Social Security’s normal retirement age decreased labor force participation rate regardless of benefits receipt status; that an increase in the delayed retirement credit increased benefit receipt regardless of labor force status; and that labor force participation and claiming Social Security benefits are strongly and negatively correlated.

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  • Bo MacInnis, 2009. "Social Security and the Joint Trends in Labor Supply and Benefits Receipt Among Older Men," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2009-22, Center for Retirement Research, revised Oct 2009.
  • Handle: RePEc:crr:crrwps:wp2009-22
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    File URL: http://crr.bc.edu/working-papers/social-security-and-the-joint-trends-in-labor-supply-and-benefits-receipt-among-older-men/
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