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Measuring competition using the Profit Elasticity: American Sugar Industry, 1890-1914


  • Boone, Jan
  • van Leuvensteijn, Michiel


The Profit Elasticity (PE) is a new competition measure introduced in Boone (2008). So far, there was no direct proof that this measure can identify regimes of competition empirically. This paper focuses on this issue using data of Genesove and Mullin (1998) in which different regimes of competition are identified. We derive a version of PE suitable for this data set. This competition measure correctly classifies the monopoly/cartel regime as being less competitive than both the price war regime and break-up of cartel regime.

Suggested Citation

  • Boone, Jan & van Leuvensteijn, Michiel, 2010. "Measuring competition using the Profit Elasticity: American Sugar Industry, 1890-1914," CEPR Discussion Papers 8159, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8159

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Michiel van Leuvensteijn & Christoffer Kok Sørensen & Jacob A. Bikker & Adrian A.R.J.M. van Rixtel, 2013. "Impact of bank competition on the interest rate pass-through in the euro area," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(11), pages 1359-1380, April.
    2. Bing Xu & Adrian Van Rixtel & Michiel Van Leuvensteijn, 2013. "Measuring bank competition in China: a comparison of new versus conventional approaches applied to loan markets," BIS Working Papers 422, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Giordano, Claire & Giugliano, Ferdinando, 2015. "A tale of two Fascisms: Labour productivity growth and competition policy in Italy, 1911–1951," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 25-38.
    4. Chiara Peroni & Ivete Ferreira, 2012. "Competition and Innovation in Luxembourg," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 93-117, March.

    More about this item


    competition; measures of competition; price cost margin; profit elasticity;

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets


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