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Do Monetary Handcuffs Restrain Leviathan? Fiscal Policy in Extreme Exchange Rate Regimes

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  • Fatás, Antonio
  • Rose, Andrew K

Abstract

This Paper is an empirical study of fiscal policy in countries with extreme monetary regimes. We study members of multilateral currency unions, dollarized countries that officially use the money of another country, and countries using currency boards. We find that belonging to an international common currency area is not associated with fiscal discipline; if anything, spending and taxes are higher inside currency unions. This effect is especially pronounced for dollarized countries that unilaterally adopt the currency of another country. Currency boards are associated with fiscal restraint.

Suggested Citation

  • Fatás, Antonio & Rose, Andrew K, 2001. "Do Monetary Handcuffs Restrain Leviathan? Fiscal Policy in Extreme Exchange Rate Regimes," CEPR Discussion Papers 2692, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2692
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    6. Anne Marie Gulde & Juha Kähkönen & Peter M Keller, 2000. "Pros and Cons of Currency Board Arrangements in the Lead-Up to EU Accession and Participation in the Euro Zone," IMF Policy Discussion Papers 00/1, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Andrew K. Rose, 1999. "One Money, One Market: Estimating the Effect of Common Currencies on Trade," NBER Working Papers 7432, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Masson & Catherine Pattillo, 2002. "Monetary Union in West Africa: An Agency of Restraint for Fiscal Policies?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 11(3), pages 387-412, September.
    2. Barry Eichengreen, 2008. "Sui Generis EMU," NBER Working Papers 13740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Charalambos Tsangarides & Pierre Ewenczyk & Michal Hulej & Mahvash Saeed Qureshi, 2009. "Are Africa's Currency Unions Good for Trade?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 56(4), pages 876-918, November.
    4. Yan M Sun, 2003. "Do Fixed Exchange Rates Induce More Fiscal Discipline?," IMF Working Papers 03/78, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Marc Flandreau & Mathilde Maurel, 2005. "Monetary Union, Trade Integration, and Business Cycles in 19th Century Europe," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 135-152, April.
    6. Catao, Luis A.V. & Terrones, Marco E., 2005. "Fiscal deficits and inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 529-554, April.
    7. Guillermo Vuletin, 2013. "Exchange Rate Regimes And Fiscal Discipline: The Role Of Capital Controls," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(4), pages 2096-2109, October.
    8. Lucotte, Yannick, 2012. "Adoption of inflation targeting and tax revenue performance in emerging market economies: An empirical investigation," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 609-628.
    9. Ondrej Schneider & Jan Zapal, 2006. "Fiscal Policy in New EU Member States: Go East, Prudent Man!," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 139-166.
    10. João Tovar Jalles & Carlos Mulas-Granados & José Tavares, 2016. "Fiscal Discipline and Exchange Rates; Does Politics Matter?," IMF Working Papers 16/230, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Lin, Hsin-Yi & Chu, Hao-Pang, 2013. "Are fiscal deficits inflationary?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 214-233.
    12. Carsten Hefeker, 2010. "Fiscal reform and monetary union in West Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 86-102.
    13. Mafi-Kreft, Elham & Kreft, Steven F., 2006. "Importing credible monetary policy: A way for transition economies to fight inflation?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 1-6, July.
    14. Dalia Grigonyté, 2003. "Impact of Currency Boards on Fiscal Policy in Central and Eastern European Countries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 111-133, June.
    15. Sèna Kimm Gnangnon, 2012. "The Effect of Development Aid Unpredictability and Migrants' Remittances on Fiscal Consolidation in Developing Countries," Working Papers halshs-00677108, HAL.
    16. Flandreau, Marc & Maurel, Mathilde, 2001. "Monetary Union, Trade Integration, and Business Cycles in 19th Century Europe: Just Do It," CEPR Discussion Papers 3087, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Rupa Duttagupta & Guillermo Tolosa, 2007. "Fiscal Discipline and Exchange Rate Arrangements: Evidence from the Caribbean," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 87-112, November.
    18. Chowdhury, Mohammad Tarequl Hasan & Bhattacharya, Prasad Sankar & Mallick, Debdulal & Ulubaşoğlu, Mehmet Ali, 2016. "Exchange rate regimes and fiscal discipline: The role of trade openness," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 106-128.
    19. Rupa Duttagupta & Guillermo Tolosa, 2007. "Fiscal Discipline and Exchange Rate Arrangements: Evidence from the Caribbean," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 87-112, November.
    20. Rupa Duttagupta & Guillermo Tolosa, 2006. "Fiscal Discipline and Exchange Rate Regimes; Evidence From the Caribbean," IMF Working Papers 06/119, International Monetary Fund.
    21. repec:eee:ecosys:v:41:y:2017:i:3:p:367-378 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Oliver Grimm, 2007. "Fiscal Discipline and Stability under Currency Board Systems," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 07/66, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    23. Eduardo Levy Yeyati, 2006. "Exchange Rate Regimes in the 2000s: A Latin American Perspective," Business School Working Papers exchangerate, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.
    24. Philipp Paulus, 2004. "The fiscal stability impact of monetary unions - looking beneath the Stability Pact debate," Otto-Wolff-Institut Discussion Paper Series 05/2004, Otto-Wolff-Institut für Wirtschaftsordnung, Köln, Deutschland.
    25. Sena Kimm GNANGNON, 2012. "The Effect of Development Aid Unpredictability and Migrants’ Remittances on Fiscal Consolidation in Developing Countries," Working Papers 201210, CERDI.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Budget; Empirical; Government; Panel; Revenue; Spending; Tax;

    JEL classification:

    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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