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Taste for Science, Academic Boundary Spanning and Inventive Performance of Scientists and Engineers in Industry

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  • Arts, Sam
  • Veugelers, Reinhilde

Abstract

Matching survey data on Ph.D. scientists and engineers currently working in an R&D job in industry with their publications and patents, we study the relationship between their individual traits and the nature of their inventive performance. We find that individuals with a strong taste for science, i.e. motivated by intellectual challenge, independence, and contribution to society, create more novel and impactful patents. Academic boundary spanning, proxied by scientific publications co-authored with academic scientists, mediates the effect of taste for science, but only partly and only on impact-weighted inventive output. For novelty of inventive output, we find no mediation through academic boundary spanning. Individuals with a strong taste for salary collaborate less with academic scientists, fully mediating the negative effect of taste for salary on impact-weighted inventive output.

Suggested Citation

  • Arts, Sam & Veugelers, Reinhilde, 2018. "Taste for Science, Academic Boundary Spanning and Inventive Performance of Scientists and Engineers in Industry," CEPR Discussion Papers 12704, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12704
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    industry-science links; taste for science;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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