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Liberty, Religiosity, and Effort

Author

Listed:
  • Esteban, Joan Maria
  • Levy, Gilat
  • Mayoral, Laura

Abstract

In this paper we study the role of religiosity and individual liberties in influencing the choice of labor effort. To a standard model with consumption and effort, we add a third (public) good: civil liberties with a cap established by law. We assume that the higher the degree of religiosity of an individual the less he likes liberties, such as divorce, abortion, gender parity, or gay marriage. With standard assumptions on individual preferences, our model implies that individual labor supply is decreasing in the level of personal religiosity and that this negative relationship is enhanced by the width of liberties. We show empirically that this holds and that the size of the effect is large. Specifically, we construct an index of civil liberties and find solid evidence in support of the joint effect of religiosity and liberties on labor effort.

Suggested Citation

  • Esteban, Joan Maria & Levy, Gilat & Mayoral, Laura, 2015. "Liberty, Religiosity, and Effort," CEPR Discussion Papers 10841, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10841
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2012. "Religiosity, human capital return and earnings in Canada," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(1/2), pages 55-80, February.
    2. Mark Koyama & Jean-Paul Carvalho, "undated". "Development and Religious Polarization: The Emergence of Reform and Ultra-Orthodox Judaism," Discussion Papers 11/11, Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Filipe Campante & David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2013. "Does Religion Affect Economic Growth and Happiness? Evidence from Ramadan," CID Working Papers 274, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    4. Iannaccone, Laurence R, 1992. "Sacrifice and Stigma: Reducing Free-Riding in Cults, Communes, and Other Collectives," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(2), pages 271-291, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    civil liberties; Labour supply; Religiosity;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

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