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Countercyclical school attainment and intergenerational mobility

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  • Andreu Arenas
  • Clément Malgouyres

Abstract

We study how economic conditions at the time of choosing post-compulsory education affect intergenerational mobility. Exploiting local variation in birthplace unemployment rate at age 16 across 23 cohorts in France, we find that cohorts deciding on post-compulsory education in bad economic times are more educationally intergenerationally mobile – their level of educational attainment is less related to having a white-collar father. These cohorts are also more occupationally intergenerationally mobile; and a large fraction of this effect is explained by business cycle-induced differences in educational attainment. Results are robust to accounting for differential spatial mobility between birth and age 16 by parental occupation. Finally, we provide additional evidence that high local unemployment at age 16 increases the relative school enrollment rate of children of blue collar workers the year after – at age 17.
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Suggested Citation

  • Andreu Arenas & Clément Malgouyres, 2018. "Countercyclical school attainment and intergenerational mobility," LIDAM Reprints CORE 2976, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:2976
    Note: In : Labour Economics, 53, 97-111, 2018
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    Cited by:

    1. Alena Bicakova & Guido Matias Cortes & Jacopo Mazza, 2018. "Caught in the Cycle: Economic Conditions at Enrollment and Labor Market Outcomes of College Graduates," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp622, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    2. Bastien Chabé-Ferret & Paula Eugenia Gobbi, 2018. "Economics Uncertainty and Fertility Cycles: The Case of the Post-WWII Baby Boom," Working Papers ECARES 2018-19, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Bárbara Castillo, 2020. "Trends in intergenerational homeownership mobility in France between 1960-2015," Working Papers halshs-02511116, HAL.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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