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Do Hedge Funds Reduce Idiosyncratic Risk?


  • Namho Kang
  • Peter Kondor
  • Ronnie Sadka


This paper studies the effect of hedge-fund trading on idiosyncratic risk. We hypothesize that while hedge-fund activity would often reduce idiosyncratic risk, high initial levels of idiosyncratic risk might be further amplified due to fund loss limits. Panel-regression analyses provide supporting evidence for this hypothesis. The results are robust to sample selection and are further corroborated by a natural experiment using the Lehman bankruptcy as an exogenous adverse shock to hedge-fund trading. Hedge-fund capital also explains the increased idiosyncratic volatility of high-idiosyncratic-volatility stocks as well as the decreased idiosyncratic volatility of low-idiosyncratic-volatility stocks over the past few decade.

Suggested Citation

  • Namho Kang & Peter Kondor & Ronnie Sadka, 2012. "Do Hedge Funds Reduce Idiosyncratic Risk?," CEU Working Papers 2012_15, Department of Economics, Central European University, revised 04 Oct 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:ceu:econwp:2012_15

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mihov, Atanas & Naranjo, Andy, 2017. "Customer-base concentration and the transmission of idiosyncratic volatility along the vertical chain," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 73-100.
    2. Agarwal, Vikas & Aragon, George O. & Shi, Zhen, 2015. "Funding liquidity risk of funds of hedge funds: Evidence from their holdings," CFR Working Papers 15-12, University of Cologne, Centre for Financial Research (CFR).

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