IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cen/wpaper/90-11.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Returns to Scale in Small and Large U.S. Manufacturing Establishments

Author

Listed:
  • Sang V Nguyen
  • Arnold P Reznek

Abstract

The objective of this study is to assess the possibility of differences in the production technologies between large and small establishments in five selected 4-digit SIC manufacturing industries. We particularly focus on estimating returns to scale and then make interferences regarding the efficiency of small businesses relative to large businesses. Using cross-section data for two census years, 1977 and 1982, we estimate a transcendental logarithmic (translog) production model that provides direct estimates of economies of scale parameters for both small and large establishments. Our primary findings are: (i) there are significant differences in the production technologies between small and large establishments; and (ii) based on the scale parameter estimates, small establishments appear to be as efficient as large establishments under normal economic conditions, suggesting that large size is not a necessary condition for efficient production. However, small establishments seem to be unable to maintain constant returns to scale production during economic recession such as that in 1982.

Suggested Citation

  • Sang V Nguyen & Arnold P Reznek, 1990. "Returns to Scale in Small and Large U.S. Manufacturing Establishments," Working Papers 90-11, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:90-11
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www2.census.gov/ces/wp/1990/CES-WP-90-11.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gallant, A. Ronald & Jorgenson, Dale W., 1979. "Statistical inference for a system of simultaneous, non-linear, implicit equations in the context of instrumental variable estimation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2-3), pages 275-302.
    2. Diewert, Walter E & Wales, Terence J, 1987. "Flexible Functional Forms and Global Curvature Conditions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(1), pages 43-68, January.
    3. Guilkey, David K & Lovell, C A Knox & Sickles, Robin C, 1983. "A Comparison of the Performance of Three Flexible Functional Forms," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 24(3), pages 591-616, October.
    4. Robert H Mcguckin & George A Pascoe, 1988. "The Longitudinal Research Database (LRD): Status And Research Possibilities," Working Papers 88-2, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    5. McFadden, Daniel, 1978. "The General Linear Profit Function," Histoy of Economic Thought Chapters,in: Fuss, Melvyn & McFadden, Daniel (ed.), Production Economics: A Dual Approach to Theory and Applications, volume 1, chapter 5 McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought.
    6. Burgess, David F., 1975. "Duality theory and pitfalls in the specification of technologies," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 105-121, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sheila A Martin & Richard Mchugh & S R Johnson, 1991. "The Influence Of Location On Productivity: Manufacturing Technology In Rural And Urban Areas," Working Papers 91-10, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Raymond Mataloni, Jr., 2011. "The Productivity Advantage and Global Scope of U.S. Multinational Firms," Working Papers 11-23, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    3. C. Praag & Peter Versloot, 2007. "What is the value of entrepreneurship? A review of recent research," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 351-382, December.
    4. repec:tsa:wpaper:0001eco is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Adela Luque & Javier Miranda, 2000. "Technology Use and Worker Outcomes: Direct Evidence from Linked Employee-Employer Data," Working Papers 00-13, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    6. Biewen, Martin & Weiser, Constantin, 2011. "A New Approach to Testing Marginal Productivity Theory," IZA Discussion Papers 6113, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Raymond Mattaloni Jr., 2011. "The Productivity Advantage and Global Scope of U.S. Multinational Firms," BEA Working Papers 0070, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    8. Edward Feser, 2004. "A Flexible Test for Agglomeration Economies in Two U.S. Manufacturing Industries," Working Papers 04-14, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    9. Tuan, Chyau & Ng, Linda F. Y., 2001. "Regional division of labor from agglomeration economies' perspective: some evidence," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 65-85.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CES; economic; research; micro; data; microdata; chief; economist;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:90-11. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dawn Anderson). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cesgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.