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Transit, Density, and Residential Satisfaction

  • Shaw, John Gordon
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    Planners and others have proposed developing high-density residential nodes around transit stations to reduce auto dependence and encourage transit use. Such nodes, the argument goes, would provide more patrons for the transit system, more shoppers for nearby stores, and more of a community for the residents. However, such high-density housing runs counter to the assumed American preference for low-density, detached homes. This study investigates the relationship between residential density and housing satisfaction. It also examines the extent to which other factors, such as proximity of the residential development to transit and respondent background variables, influence thier relationship.Â

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    Paper provided by University of California Transportation Center in its series University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers with number qt8xk3c9z7.

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    Date of creation: 01 Jan 1994
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt8xk3c9z7
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    1. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    2. Brookshire, David S, et al, 1982. "Valuing Public Goods: A Comparison of Survey and Hedonic Approaches," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(1), pages 165-77, March.
    3. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132.
    4. Dewees, D. N., 1976. "The effect of a subway on residential property values in Toronto," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 357-369, October.
    5. D E Dowall & J B Juhasz, 1978. "Trade-off surveys in planning: theory and application," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 10(2), pages 125-136, February.
    6. P B McLeod, 1984. "The demand for local amenity: an hedonic price analysis," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 16(3), pages 389-400, March.
    7. Amos Hawley, 1972. "Population density and the city," Demography, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 521-529, November.
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