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Noise Reduced Realized Volatility: A Kalman Filter Approach

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  • Owens, John
  • Steigerwald, Douglas G

Abstract

Microstructure noise contaminates high-frequency estimates of asset price volatility. Recent work has determined a preferred sampling frequency under the assumption that the properties of noise are constant. Given the sampling frequency, the high-frequency observations are given equal weight. While convenient, constant weights are not necessarily efficient. We use the Kalman filter to derive more efficient weights, for any given sampling frequency. We demonstrate the efficacy of the procedure through an extensive simulation exercise, showing that our filter compares favorably to more traditional methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Owens, John & Steigerwald, Douglas G, 2009. "Noise Reduced Realized Volatility: A Kalman Filter Approach," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt4n80536m, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:ucsbec:qt4n80536m
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andersen T. G & Bollerslev T. & Diebold F. X & Labys P., 2001. "The Distribution of Realized Exchange Rate Volatility," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 96, pages 42-55, March.
    2. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Diebold, Francis X. & Ebens, Heiko, 2001. "The distribution of realized stock return volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 43-76, July.
    3. Andreou, Elena & Ghysels, Eric, 2002. "Rolling-Sample Volatility Estimators: Some New Theoretical, Simulation, and Empirical Results," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(3), pages 363-376, July.
    4. Yacine Aït-Sahalia, 2005. "How Often to Sample a Continuous-Time Process in the Presence of Market Microstructure Noise," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 18(2), pages 351-416.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard & Frederiksen, Per, 2008. "Finite sample accuracy and choice of sampling frequency in integrated volatility estimation," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 265-286, March.
    2. Tim Bollerslev & Andrew J. Patton & Wenjing Wang, 2016. "Daily House Price Indices: Construction, Modeling, and Longer‐run Predictions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(6), pages 1005-1025, September.
    3. Daisuke Nagakura & Toshiaki Watanabe, 2015. "A State Space Approach to Estimating the Integrated Variance under the Existence of Market Microstructure Noise," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 13(1), pages 45-82.
    4. Taylor, Nicholas, 2008. "Can idiosyncratic volatility help forecast stock market volatility?," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 462-479.
    5. Hansen, Peter R. & Lunde, Asger, 2006. "Realized Variance and Market Microstructure Noise," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 24, pages 127-161, April.
    6. Patton, Andrew J., 2011. "Data-based ranking of realised volatility estimators," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 161(2), pages 284-303, April.

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