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A Comparison of Exchange Economies within a Monetary Business Cycle

Author

Listed:
  • Benk, Szilárd
  • Gillman, Max

    () (Cardiff Business School)

  • Kejak, Michal

Abstract

The paper sets out a monetary business cycle model with three alternative exchange technologies, the cash-only, shopping time, and credit production models. The goods productivity and money shocks affect all three models, while the credit model has in addition a credit productivity shock. The paper compares the performance of the models in explaining the puzzles of the monetary business cycle theory. The credit model improves the ability to explain the procyclic movement of monetary aggregates, inflation and the nominal interest rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Benk, Szilárd & Gillman, Max & Kejak, Michal, 2005. "A Comparison of Exchange Economies within a Monetary Business Cycle," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2005/14, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdf:wpaper:2005/14
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2005. "Contrasting Models of the Effect of Inflation on Growth," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 113-136, February.
    2. William T. Gavin & Finn E. Kydland, 1999. "Endogenous Money Supply and the Business Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 2(2), pages 347-369, April.
    3. Max Gillman & Mark N. Harris & László Mátyás, 2004. "Inflation and growth: Explaining a negative effect," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 149-167, January.
    4. Szilárd Benk & Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2005. "Credit Shocks in the Financial Deregulatory Era: Not the Usual Suspects," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 8(3), pages 668-687, July.
    5. Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2005. "Inflation and Balanced-Path Growth with Alternative Payment Mechanisms," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(500), pages 247-270, January.
    6. William J. Baumol, 1952. "The Transactions Demand for Cash: An Inventory Theoretic Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 545-556.
    7. Max Gillman & Mark N. Harris, 2004. "Inflation, Financial Development and Endogenous Growth," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 24/04, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    8. Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2004. "The Demand for Bank Reserves and Other Monetary Aggregates," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(3), pages 518-533, July.
    9. Gillman, Max & Otto, Glenn, 2003. "Money demand in a banking time economy," HWWA Discussion Papers 254, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    10. Andreas Schabert, "undated". "On the Equivalence of Money Growth and Interest Rate Policy," Working Papers 2003_6, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow, revised Apr 2003.
    11. Gillman, Max & Otto, Glenn, 2003. "Money Demand in a Banking Time Economy," Discussion Paper Series 26221, Hamburg Institute of International Economics.
    12. Li, Victor E, 2000. "Household Credit and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 335-356, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cash-in-advance; credit production; cycle; inflation;

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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