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Equity Premium: Interaction of Belief Heterogeneity and Distribution of Wealth?


  • Filippo Taddei


Introducing heterogeneity of beliefs across different agents builds a link between wealth distribution and the equity premium. We demonstrate that an economy populated only by risk neutral agents may nonetheless display a strictly positive equity premium. We then place our notion of belief heterogeneity within the popular representative agent construct. We show that any level of belief heterogeneity in the multi agent economy can be mapped into some specific degree of risk aversion of the representative agent economy that keeps equilibrium prices constant. A fully dynamic model follows. Finally, we suggest an explanation for the recent behavior of the equity premium: a story of "heterogeneous optimism" versus "homogeneous pessimism" is presented.

Suggested Citation

  • Filippo Taddei, 2007. "Equity Premium: Interaction of Belief Heterogeneity and Distribution of Wealth?," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 67, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  • Handle: RePEc:cca:wpaper:67

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Belief Heterogeneity; Equity Premium Puzzle; Representative Agent; Risk Aversion; Wealth Distribution.;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D51 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Exchange and Production Economies
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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