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Turkey's Experience with Disinflation: Where did all the welfare gains go?

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  • Bilin Neyapti

Abstract

This article measures the welfare gains from disinflation in Turkey during the 2000s. Estimated welfare gains exceed the real output gains, which is likely to arise from persisting allocative inefficiencies, pointing at the need for further structural and institutional reforms for the benefits of price stability to be utilized towards achieving sustainable development.
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  • Bilin Neyapti, 2012. "Turkey's Experience with Disinflation: Where did all the welfare gains go?," Working Papers 1201, Department of Economics, Bilkent University.
  • Handle: RePEc:bil:wpaper:1201
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    File URL: http://econ.bilkent.edu.tr/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/12-01_DP_BilinNeyapti.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    11. Emanuel Barnea & Nissan Liviatan, 2008. "The chronic inflation process: a model and evidence from Brazil and Israel," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 151-162.
    12. Serletis, Apostolos & Yavari, Kazem, 2004. "The welfare cost of inflation in Canada and the United States," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 199-204, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bilin Neyapti, 2016. "From Monetary Policy to Macroprudentials: the Aftermath of the Great Recession," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1629, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.

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