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Measuring the Impacts of Sea Level Rise on Marine Recreational Shore Fishing in North Carolina

Author

Listed:
  • John C. Whitehead
  • Ben Poulter
  • Christopher F. Dumas
  • Okmyung Bin

Abstract

We develop estimates of the economic effects of sea level rise on marine recreational shore fishing in North Carolina. We estimate the relationship between angler behavior and spatial differences in beach width using the Marine Recreational Fishing Statistics Survey and geospatial data. We exploit the empirical relationship between beach width and site choice by simulating the effects of (1) sea level rise on beach width and (2) beach width on angler site choice. We find that the welfare losses are potentially substantial, ranging up to a present value of $1.26 billion over 75 years. Key Words: marine recreational fishing, travel cost method, climate change, sea level rise

Suggested Citation

  • John C. Whitehead & Ben Poulter & Christopher F. Dumas & Okmyung Bin, 2008. "Measuring the Impacts of Sea Level Rise on Marine Recreational Shore Fishing in North Carolina," Working Papers 08-09, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  • Handle: RePEc:apl:wpaper:08-09
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    File URL: http://econ.appstate.edu/RePEc/pdf/wp0809.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jeffrey Englin & Klaus Moeltner, 2004. "The Value of Snowfall to Skiers and Boarders," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 29(1), pages 123-136, September.
    2. Parsons, George R. & Jakus, Paul M. & Tomasi, Ted, 1999. "A Comparison of Welfare Estimates from Four Models for Linking Seasonal Recreational Trips to Multinomial Logit Models of Site Choice," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 143-157, September.
    3. Richardson, Robert B. & Loomis, John B., 2004. "Adaptive recreation planning and climate change: a contingent visitation approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1-2), pages 83-99, September.
    4. Kenneth E. McConnell, 1977. "Congestion and Willingness to Pay: A Study of Beach Use," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 53(2), pages 185-195.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. I can only hope
      by John Whitehead in Environmental Economics on 2009-04-10 17:53:00

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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