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A Simple Model Of Demand-Led Growth And Income Distribution



This paper presents a one-sector demand-led model where capital and non-capital expenditures determine income growth and distribution. The basic idea is to build a simple dynamical accounting model for the growth rate of the capital stock, the ratio of non-capital expenditures to the capital stock, and the labor share of income. By inserting some stylized behavioral functions in the identities, the paper analyzes the implications of alternative theoretical closures of income determination (effective demand) and distribution (social conflict). On the demand side, two behavioral functions define the growth rates of capital and non-capital expenditures as functions of capacity utilization (measured by the output-capital ratio) and income distribution (measured by the labor share of income). On the distribution side, another two behavioral functions describe the growth rates of the real wage and labor productivity also as functions of capacity utilization and income distribution. The growth rates of total factor productivity and employment follow residually from the accounting identities and, in this way, the demand-led model can encompass supply-driven models as a special case.

Suggested Citation

  • Nelson H. Barbosa Filho, 2004. "A Simple Model Of Demand-Led Growth And Income Distribution," Anais do XXXII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 32th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 038, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
  • Handle: RePEc:anp:en2004:038

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. A. K. Sen, 1963. "Neo‐Classical And Neo‐Keynbsian Theories Of Distribution," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 39(85), pages 53-64, March.
    2. Kurz,Heinz D. & Salvadori,Neri, 1997. "Theory of Production," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521588676, March.
    3. Nelson H. Barbosa-Filho & Lance Taylor, 2006. "Distributive And Demand Cycles In The Us Economy-A Structuralist Goodwin Model," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(3), pages 389-411, July.
    4. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald, 1995. "The Wage Curve," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026202375x, July.
    5. Miguel Leon-Ledesma & A.P. Thirlwall, 2007. "Is the Natural Rate of Growth Exogenous?," Chapters,in: Economic Growth, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Jesus Felipe & Franklin M. Fisher, 2003. "Aggregation in Production Functions: What Applied Economists should Know," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2-3), pages 208-262, May.
    7. Blinder, Alan S, 1997. "Is There a Core of Practical Macroeconomics That We Should All Believe?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 240-243, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rudiger von Arnim & Jose Barrales, 2015. "Demand-driven Goodwin cycles with Kaldorian and Kaleckian features," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 3(3), pages 351-373, July.
    2. Glötzl, Erhard, 2015. "Why and How to overcome General Equilibrium Theory," MPRA Paper 66265, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Nelson H. Barbosa-Filho, 2014. "A Structuralist Inflation Curve," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 349-376, May.
    4. Nelson Henrique Barbosa Filho, 2016. "Elasticity Of Substitution And Social Conflict: A Structuralist Note On Piketty’S Capital In The 21st Century," Anais do XLII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 42ndd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 074, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].

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    JEL classification:

    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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