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Staple Food Consumption Patterns in Urban Zambia: Results from the 2007/2008 Urban Consumption Survey

Author

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  • Mason, Nicole M.
  • Jayne, Thomas S.

Abstract

After two decades of de-urbanization, Zambia is again becoming increasingly urban. While the urban share of the population fell to 35% in 2000 due primarily to the decline of the copper industry, over half of Zambia’s people will be residing in urban areas by 2040. Given this urbanization trajectory, to be effective, policies to promote smallholder agriculture and improved urban food marketing system performance in Zambia will need to take into consideration the demand patterns of urban food consumers. Urban consumption patterns will increasingly determine the opportunities available to small-scale farmers. Accurate information on urban consumer preferences can also help identify key leverage points and investment priorities to improve the performance of the food marketing system.

Suggested Citation

  • Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2009. "Staple Food Consumption Patterns in Urban Zambia: Results from the 2007/2008 Urban Consumption Survey," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56803, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:56803
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/56803
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    Cited by:

    1. Lividini, Keith & Fiedler, John L., 2015. "Assessing the promise of biofortification: A case study of high provitamin A maize in Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 65-77.
    2. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe, 2012. "Urban Consumption Patterns of Livestock Products in Zambia and Implications for Policy," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 132343, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Anonymous, 2010. "Smallholder Marketing Behavior and Urban Consumption Patterns in Eastern and Southern Africa," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 62155, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Kuteya, Auckland N., 2013. "The Maize Price Spike of 2012/13: Understanding the Paradox of High Prices despite Abundant Supplies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171871, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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