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Sharing R&D Investments in Breakthrough Technologies to Control Climate Change

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  • Rubio, Santiago J.

Abstract

This paper examines international cooperation on technological development as an alternative to international cooperation on GHG emission reductions. In order to analyze the scope of cooperation, a three-stage technology agreement formation game is solved. First, countries decide whether or not to sign up to the agreement. Then, in the second stage, the signatories (playing together) and the non-signatories (playing individually) select their investment in R&D. In this stage, it is assumed that the signatories not only coordinate their levels of R&D investment but also pool their R&D efforts to fully internalize the spillovers of their investment in innovation. Finally, in the third stage, each country decides non-cooperatively upon its level of energy production. Emissions depend on the decisions made regarding investment and production. If a country decides to develop a breakthrough technology in the second stage, its emissions will be zero in the third stage. For linear environmental damages and quadratic investment costs, the grand coalition is stable if marginal damages are large enough to justify the development of a breakthrough technology that eliminates emissions completely, and if technology spillovers are not very important.

Suggested Citation

  • Rubio, Santiago J., 2016. "Sharing R&D Investments in Breakthrough Technologies to Control Climate Change," MITP: Mitigation, Innovation and Transformation Pathways 232181, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:feemmi:232181
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.232181
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/232181/files/NDL2016-002.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:eneeco:v:68:y:2017:i:s1:p:89-102 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Michael Hübler & Michael Finus, 2013. "Is the risk of North–South technology transfer failure an obstacle to a cooperative climate change agreement?," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 461-479, November.
    3. Hans Gersbach & Marie-Catherine Riekhof, 2017. "Technology Treaties and Climate Change," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 17/268, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    4. Blasch, Julia & Boogen, Nina & Filippini, Massimo & Kumar, Nilkanth, 2017. "Explaining electricity demand and the role of energy and investment literacy on end-use efficiency of Swiss households," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(S1), pages 89-102.
    5. Santiago J. Rubio, 2018. "Self-Enforcing International Environmental Agreements: Adaptation and Complementarity," Working Papers 2018.29, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation

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