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The environmental benefits of investment in agricultural science and technology: an application of global spatial benefit transfer

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  • McVittie, Alistair
  • Hussain, Salman
  • Brander, Luke M.
  • Wagtendonk, Alfred
  • Verburg, Peter H.
  • Vardakoulias, Olivier

Abstract

Food security is a major current and future policy concern. The world population is projected to reach 9 billion by 2050 and continuing growth in economic output and incomes is expected to result in changing food consumption patterns. In particular the wider adoption of ‘Western’ diets will result in both higher calorie intake and greater meat consumption. Continuing climate change is expected to add further pressures to agricultural production. This paper presents the results of a global analysis funded by the TEEB study on the environmental benefits of investment in agricultural knowledge, science and technology, specifically in terms of closing the gaps between developing and developed country agricultural productivity. The results show that by easing pressures on land use change on terrestrial biomes (forests and grasslands), and the ecosystem services they provide, investment in agricultural science and technology provides environmental benefits of US$161.3bn per annum in 2050. Between 2000 and 2050 these benefits amount to US$2,964bn in addition to US$6,343bn in carbon benefits and compare to costs of US$5,68bn

Suggested Citation

  • McVittie, Alistair & Hussain, Salman & Brander, Luke M. & Wagtendonk, Alfred & Verburg, Peter H. & Vardakoulias, Olivier, 2011. "The environmental benefits of investment in agricultural science and technology: an application of global spatial benefit transfer," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108955, Agricultural Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc11:108955
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barrio, Melina & Loureiro, Maria L., 2010. "A meta-analysis of contingent valuation forest studies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 1023-1030, March.
    2. Luke Brander & Raymond Florax & Jan Vermaat, 2006. "The Empirics of Wetland Valuation: A Comprehensive Summary and a Meta-Analysis of the Literature," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 33(2), pages 223-250, February.
    3. Lindhjem, Henrik & Navrud, Ståle, 2008. "How reliable are meta-analyses for international benefit transfers?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2-3), pages 425-435, June.
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    Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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