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Demand for Drought Tolerance in Africa: Selection of Drought Tolerant Maize Seed using Framed Field Experiments

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  • Dalton, Timothy J.
  • Yesuf, Mahmud
  • Muhammad, Lutta

Abstract

Recent projections on the impact of climate change argue that eastern and southern Africa will be two regions around the globe that will experience dramatic reductions in maize yields by mid‐century. Absent from these projections is any consideration for farmer adaptation of cropping practices or land reallocation. This research quantifies risk, loss and ambiguity aversion for a sample of smallholder Kenyan farmers using framed field experiments. This behavioral information, directly elicited, is used to condition the selection of maize varieties differentiated by drought tolerance, pest resistance, maturity, and seed price. Overall, the willingness to pay for drought tolerance and other attributes is highly heterogeneous as determined through a Latent Class modeling approach. Failing to account for farmer heterogeneity biases the potential welfare gains from this technology. Secondly, willingness to pay estimates identify segments of farmers that are seed‐price sensitive and this elastic demand may limit technology purchase and the eventual impact of this adaptation strategy without seed market intervention.

Suggested Citation

  • Dalton, Timothy J. & Yesuf, Mahmud & Muhammad, Lutta, 2011. "Demand for Drought Tolerance in Africa: Selection of Drought Tolerant Maize Seed using Framed Field Experiments," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103712, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea11:103712
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.103712
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/103712/files/Dallton%20AAEA%202011%20drought.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Arora, Anchal & Bansal, Sangeeta & Ward, Patrick S., 2015. "Eliciting farmers’ valuation for abiotic stress-tolerant rice in India:," IFPRI discussion papers 1409, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Mahmud Yesuf & Robert M. Feinberg, 2016. "Ambiguity aversion among student subjects: the role of probability interval and emotional parameters," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 235-238, March.
    3. Ward, Patrick S. & Makhija, Simrin, 2018. "New modalities for managing drought risk in rainfed agriculture: Evidence from a discrete choice experiment in Odisha, India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 163-175.
    4. Thornton, Philip K. & Lipper, Leslie, 2014. "How does climate change alter agricultural strategies to support food security?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1340, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Maligalig, R. & Umbeger, W. & Demont, M. & Peralta, A., 2018. "Farmer preferences for rice varietal trait improvements in Nueva Ecija, Philippines: A latent class cluster approach," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277476, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Maligalig, Rio L. & Demont, Matty & Umberger, Wendy J. & Peralta, Alexandra, 2017. "Intrahousehold decision making on rice varietal trait improvements: Using experiments to estimate gender influence," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258522, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Ward, Patrick S. & Makhija, Simrin, 2016. "New modalities for managing drought risk in rainfed agriculture: Evidence from a discrete choice experiment in Odisha, India:," IFPRI discussion papers 1563, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Kostandini, Genti & La Rovere, Roberto & Abdoulaye, Tahirou, 2013. "Potential impacts of increasing average yields and reducing maize yield variability in Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 213-226.

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    Keywords

    Crop Production/Industries;

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