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Comment on "Fertility Theories: Can They Explain the Negative Fertility-Income Relationship?"

In: Demography and the Economy

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  • Amalia R. Miller

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  • Amalia R. Miller, 2010. "Comment on "Fertility Theories: Can They Explain the Negative Fertility-Income Relationship?"," NBER Chapters, in: Demography and the Economy, pages 101-105, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8407
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amalia Miller, 2011. "The effects of motherhood timing on career path," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(3), pages 1071-1100, July.
    2. Pierre-André Chiappori & Sonia Oreffice, 2008. "Birth Control and Female Empowerment: An Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(1), pages 113-140, February.
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