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The Effect of U.S. State Tax and Investment Promotion Policy on the Distribution of Inward Direct Investment

In: Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting

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  • Deborah L. Swenson

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  • Deborah L. Swenson, 1998. "The Effect of U.S. State Tax and Investment Promotion Policy on the Distribution of Inward Direct Investment," NBER Chapters, in: Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting, pages 285-314, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:6824
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carroll, Robert & Wasylenko, Michael J., 1994. "Do State Business Climates Still Matter? -- Evidence of a Structural Change," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 47(1), pages 19-37, March.
    2. Carroll, Robert & Wasylenko, Michael J., 1994. "Do State Business Climates Still Matter? -- Evidence of a Structural Change," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 47(1), pages 19-37, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Blomström, Magnus & Kokko, Ari, 2003. "The Economics of Foreign Direct Investment Incentives," EIJS Working Paper Series 168, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.

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