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A Cautionary Tale in Comparative Effectiveness Research: Pitfalls and Perils of Observational Data Analysis

In: Measuring and Modeling Health Care Costs

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  • Armando Franco
  • Dana P. Goldman
  • Adam Leive
  • Daniel McFadden

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Armando Franco & Dana P. Goldman & Adam Leive & Daniel McFadden, 2017. "A Cautionary Tale in Comparative Effectiveness Research: Pitfalls and Perils of Observational Data Analysis," NBER Chapters, in: Measuring and Modeling Health Care Costs, pages 55-80, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:13104
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gornick, M.E., 2003. "A Decade of Research on Disparities in Medicare Utilization: Lessons for the Health and Health Care of Vulnerable Men," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 93(5), pages 753-759.
    2. Anirban Basu & James J. Heckman & Salvador Navarro-Lozano & Sergio Urzua, 2007. "Use of instrumental variables in the presence of heterogeneity and self-selection: an application to treatments of breast cancer patients," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(11), pages 1133-1157.
    3. Anup Malani, 2006. "Identifying Placebo Effects with Data from Clinical Trials," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(2), pages 236-256, April.
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