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The economics of military manpower

In: Handbook of Defense Economics

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  • Warner, John T.

Abstract

The USA and other countries spend a significant portion of their defense budgets on personnel. Effective management of military forces requires an understanding of the economics of military manpower. Over the past three decades economists have produced a substantial body of research about the subject. This chapter distills this literature for a general audience. Topics surveyed include the supply of personnel, personnel productivity and the demand for personnel, procurement by conscription versus voluntary means, the structure of pay, the use of women and reservists, and the civilian return to military training and experience. It also points to directions for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Warner, John T., 1995. "The economics of military manpower," Handbook of Defense Economics,in: Keith Hartley & Todd Sandler (ed.), Handbook of Defense Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 13, pages 347-398 Elsevier.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hdechp:1-13
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jim Rolfe & Arthur Grimes, 2002. "Australia-New Zealand Defence Cooperation: Some Considerations," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 9(1), pages 47-64.
    2. MacDonald, Peter, 2013. "Labour substitution and the scope for military outsourcing," MPRA Paper 46688, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. John T. Warner & Beth J. Asch, 2001. "The Record and Prospects of the All-Volunteer Military in the United States," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(2), pages 169-192, Spring.
    4. Peter Macdonald, 2006. "Capital-Labour Substitution In Uk Armed Forces," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 141-153.
    5. Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2007. "Conscription: Economic costs and political allure," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 2(1), pages 6-15, January.
    6. Bradley M. Gray & James E. Grefer, 2012. "Career Earnings And Retention Of U.S. Military Physicians," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 51-76, February.
    7. Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2011. "The Political Economy of Conscription," Chapters,in: The Handbook on the Political Economy of War, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Katarina Keller & Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2009. "Military Draft And Economic Growth In Oecd Countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(5), pages 373-393, October.
    9. Georgios P. Kouretas & Mark E. Wohar, 2012. "The dynamics of inflation: a study of a large number of countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(16), pages 2001-2026, June.
    10. Katarina Keller & Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2009. "Does Military Draft Discourage Enrollment in Higher Education? Evidence from OECD Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 2838, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Chaturvedi, Alok & Mehta, Shailendra & Dolk, Daniel & Ayer, Rick, 2005. "Agent-based simulation for computational experimentation: Developing an artificial labor market," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 166(3), pages 694-716, November.
    12. Beth Asch & Paul Heaton, 2008. "Monopsony and Labor Supply in the Army and Navy," Working Papers 1107, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    13. Katarina Keller & Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2010. "Does a Military Draft Discourage Enrollment in Higher Education?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 66(2), pages 97-120, June.
    14. Majbouri, Mahdi, 2017. "Sir! I'd Rather Go to School, Sir!," IZA Discussion Papers 10787, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Yew-Kwang Ng, 2008. "Why is the Military Draft Common? Conscription and Increasing Returns," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 9(2), pages 373-384, November.

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