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Emma Alice Louise Riley

Personal Details

First Name:Emma
Middle Name:Alice Louise
Last Name:Riley
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pri396
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://emmaalriley.wordpress.com/research/
Twitter: @emmariley19

Affiliation

(95%) Department of Economics
University of Washington

Seattle, Washington (United States)
http://www.econ.washington.edu/
RePEc:edi:deuwaus (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE)
Department of Economics
Oxford University

Oxford, United Kingdom
http://www.csae.ox.ac.uk/
RePEc:edi:csaoxuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Anandi Mani & Emma Riley, 2019. "Social networks, role models, peer effects, and aspirations," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-120, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Emma Riley, 2017. "Role models in movies: the impact of Queen of Katwe on students’ educational attainment," CSAE Working Paper Series 2017-13, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Emma Riley, 2016. "Mobile Money and Risk Sharing Against Aggregate Shocks," CSAE Working Paper Series 2016-16, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

Articles

  1. Mahmud, Mahreen & Riley, Emma, 2021. "Household response to an extreme shock: Evidence on the immediate impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on economic outcomes and well-being in rural Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 140(C).
  2. Riley, Emma, 2018. "Mobile money and risk sharing against village shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 43-58.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Anandi Mani & Emma Riley, 2019. "Social networks, role models, peer effects, and aspirations," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-120, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    Cited by:

    1. Francisco Meneses, 2021. "Intergenerational Mobility After Expanding Educational Opportunities: A Quasi Experiment," Working Papers 586, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Omer Siddique & Durr-e-Nayab, 2020. "Aspirations and Behaviour: Future in the Mindset The Link between Aspiration Failure and the Poverty Trap," PIDE-Working Papers 2020:13, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    3. Patrizio Piraino, 2020. "Drivers of mobility," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-6, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  2. Emma Riley, 2017. "Role models in movies: the impact of Queen of Katwe on students’ educational attainment," CSAE Working Paper Series 2017-13, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Ingar K. Haaland & Christopher Roth & Johannes Wohlfart, 2020. "Designing Information Provision Experiments," CESifo Working Paper Series 8406, CESifo.
    2. Anandi Mani & Emma Riley, 2019. "Social networks, role models, peer effects, and aspirations," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-120, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Aregawi G. Gebremariam & Elisabetta Lodigiani & Giacomo Pasini, 2017. "The impact of Ethiopian Productive Safety-net Program on children's educational aspirations," Working Papers 2017:26, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    4. Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Björn Nilsson, 2021. "Role models and migration intentions," Working Papers hal-03105639, HAL.
    5. Elijah Kipkech Kipchumba & Catherine Porter & Danila Serra & Munshi Sulaiman, 2021. "Infuencing youths' aspirations and gender attitudes through role models: Evidence from Somali schools," Working Papers 20210224-002, Texas A&M University, Department of Economics.
    6. Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and & Björn Nilsson, 2020. "Role models and migration intentions," Working Paper 519bfbde-8d2e-4e86-bd62-0, Agence française de développement.
    7. Chung, Bobby W., 2020. "Peers’ parents and educational attainment: The exposure effect," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    8. Abate, Gashaw T. & Bernard, Tanguy & Makhija, Simrin & Spielman, David J., 2019. "Accelerating technical change through video-mediated agricultural extension: Evidence from Ethiopia:," IFPRI discussion papers 1851, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Marcela Ibañez Diaz & Menusch Khadjavi & Christina Martini, 2021. "Community Aspirations and Cooperation: Prescriptive vs. Descriptive Role Models," GlobalFood Discussion Papers 309650, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.

  3. Emma Riley, 2016. "Mobile Money and Risk Sharing Against Aggregate Shocks," CSAE Working Paper Series 2016-16, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Abiona, Olukorede & Koppensteiner, Martin Foureaux, 2018. "Financial Inclusion, Shocks and Poverty: Evidence from the Expansion of Mobile Money in Tanzania," IZA Discussion Papers 11928, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Melia, Elvis, 2019. "The impact of information and communication technologies on jobs in Africa: a literature review," Discussion Papers 3/2019, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
    3. Ahmad Hassan Ahmad & Christopher Green & Fei Jiang, 2020. "Mobile Money, Financial Inclusion And Development: A Review With Reference To African Experience," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(4), pages 753-792, September.

Articles

  1. Mahmud, Mahreen & Riley, Emma, 2021. "Household response to an extreme shock: Evidence on the immediate impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on economic outcomes and well-being in rural Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 140(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Soontaree Suratana & Ratipark Tamornpark & Tawatchai Apidechkul & Peeradone Srichan & Thanatchaporn Mulikaburt & Pilasinee Wongnuch & Siwarak Kitchanapaibul & Fartima Yeemard & Anusorn Udplong, 2021. "Impacts of and survival adaptations to the COVID-19 pandemic among the hill tribe population of northern Thailand: A qualitative study," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 16(6), pages 1-16, June.
    2. Swati Dhingra & Stephen Machin, 2020. "The crisis and job guarantees in urban India," CEP Discussion Papers dp1719, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Dessy, Sylvain & Gninafon, Horace & Tiberti, Luca & Tiberti, Marco, 2021. "COVID-19 and Children's School Resilience: Evidence from Nigeria," GLO Discussion Paper Series 952, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Fitzpatrick, Anne & Beg, Sabrin & Derksen, Laura & Karing, Anne & Kerwin, Jason & Lucas, Adrienne M. & Ordaz Reynoso, Natalia & Squires, Munir, 2021. "Health knowledge and non-pharmaceutical interventions during the Covid-19 pandemic in Africa," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 33-53.
    5. Richard P. Fisher & Allan Lewandowski & Tesfayohanes W. Yacob & Barbara J. Ward & Lauren M. Hafford & Ryan B. Mahoney & Cori J. Oversby & Dragan Mejic & Dana H. Hauschulz & R. Scott Summers & Karl G. , 2021. "Solar Thermal Processing to Disinfect Human Waste," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(9), pages 1-16, April.

  2. Riley, Emma, 2018. "Mobile money and risk sharing against village shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 43-58.

    Cited by:

    1. Anandi Mani & Emma Riley, 2019. "Social networks, role models, peer effects, and aspirations," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-120, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Abiona, Olukorede & Koppensteiner, Martin Foureaux, 2018. "Financial Inclusion, Shocks and Poverty: Evidence from the Expansion of Mobile Money in Tanzania," IZA Discussion Papers 11928, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Spantig, Lisa, 2021. "Cash in hand and savings decisions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 188(C), pages 1206-1220.
    4. N'dri, Lasme Mathieu & Kakinaka, Makoto, 2020. "Financial inclusion, mobile money, and individual welfare: The case of Burkina Faso," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3).
    5. Mr. Roberto Perrelli & Mr. Matthieu Bellon & Carlo Pizzinelli, 2020. "Household Consumption Volatility and Poverty Risk: Case Studies from South Africa and Tanzania," IMF Working Papers 2020/051, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Jean N. Lee & Jonathan Morduch & Saravana Ravindran & Abu Shonchoy & Hassan Zaman, 2021. "Poverty and Migration in the Digital Age: Experimental Evidence on Mobile Banking in Bangladesh," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 38-71, January.
    7. Sajid, Osama & Bevis, Leah E.M., 2021. "Flooding and child health: Evidence from Pakistan," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 146(C).
    8. Bottan, Nicolas & Hoffmann, Bridget & Vera-Cossio, Diego A., 2021. "Stepping up during a crisis: The unintended effects of a noncontributory pension program during the Covid-19 pandemic," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 150(C).
    9. Kabengele, Christian & Hahn, Rüdiger, 2021. "Institutional and firm-level factors for mobile money adoption in emerging markets–A configurational analysis," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 171(C).
    10. Hiroyuki Egami & Tomoya Matsumoto, 2020. "Mobile Money Use and Healthcare Utilization: Evidence from Rural Uganda," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(9), pages 1-34, May.
    11. Joel Cariolle & Jenny Aker, 2020. "The Use of Digital for Public Service Provision in Sub-Saharan Africa," Post-Print hal-03003899, HAL.
    12. Askar Ismailov & Albert Benson Kimaro & Hisahiro Naito, 2019. "The Effect of Mobile Money Usage on Borrowing, Saving, and Receiving Remittances: Evidence from Tanzania," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2019-002, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    13. Naito, Hisahiro & Ismailov, Askar & Kimaro, Albert Benson, 2021. "The effect of mobile money on borrowing and saving: Evidence from Tanzania," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 23(C).
    14. Yiping Huang & Xue Wang & Xun Wang, 2020. "Mobile Payment in China: Practice and Its Effects," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 19(3), pages 1-18, Fall.
    15. Isaac Appiah-Otoo & Na Song, 2021. "The Impact of Fintech on Poverty Reduction: Evidence from China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(9), pages 1-13, May.
    16. Haseeb Ahmed & Benjamin W. Cowan, 2019. "Mobile Money and Healthcare Use: Evidence from East Africa," NBER Working Papers 25669, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Jean N. Lee & Jonathan Morduch & Saravana Ravindran & Abu S. Shonchoy, 2021. "Narrowing the Gender Gap in Mobile Banking," Working Papers 2108, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
    18. Catia Batista & Pedro C. Vicente, 2021. "Is Mobile Money Changing Rural Africa? Evidence from a Field Experiment," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2116, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    19. Ky, Serge Stéphane & Rugemintwari, Clovis & Sauviat, Alain, 2021. "Friends or Foes? Mobile money interaction with formal and informal finance," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(1).
    20. Batista, Catia & Vicente, Pedro C., 2020. "Improving access to savings through mobile money: Experimental evidence from African smallholder farmers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    21. Joseph Mawejje & Paul Lakuma, 2019. "Macroeconomic effects of Mobile money: evidence from Uganda," Financial Innovation, Springer;Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, vol. 5(1), pages 1-20, December.
    22. Pelletier, Adeline & Khavul, Susanna & Estrin, Saul, 2019. "Innovations in emerging markets: the case of mobile money," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 101150, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    23. Ahmed, Haseeb & Cowan, Benjamin, 2021. "Mobile money and healthcare use: Evidence from East Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 141(C).
    24. Luc Jacolin & Massil Keneck & Alphonse Noah, 2019. "Informal Sector and Mobile Financial Services in Developing Countries: Does Financial Innovation Matter?," Working papers 721, Banque de France.
    25. Ben Brunckhorst, 2020. "Rural Mobility and Climate Vulnerability: Evidence from the 2015 Drought in Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 2020-17, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    26. Haenssgen, Marco J. & Charoenboon, Nutcha & Zanello, Giacomo, 2021. "You’ve got a friend in me: How social networks and mobile phones facilitate healthcare access among marginalised groups in rural Thailand and Lao PDR," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    27. Xue Wang, 2020. "Mobile Payment and Informal Business: Evidence from China's Household Panel Data," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 28(3), pages 90-115, May.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Rankings

This author is among the top 5% authors according to these criteria:
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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-NET: Network Economics (2) 2016-08-14 2020-02-24. Author is listed
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2017-09-10 2020-02-24. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2017-09-10. Author is listed
  4. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2017-09-10. Author is listed
  5. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2017-09-10. Author is listed
  6. NEP-MFD: Microfinance (1) 2016-08-14. Author is listed
  7. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2020-02-24. Author is listed
  8. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (1) 2016-08-14. Author is listed
  9. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2020-02-24. Author is listed

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