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Steven P. Lanza

Personal Details

First Name:Steven
Middle Name:P.
Last Name:Lanza
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pla739
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.theconnecticuteconomy.com

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Connecticut

Storrs, Connecticut (United States)
http://www.econ.uconn.edu/

: (860) 486-4889
(860) 486-4463
309 Oak Hall, 365 Fairfield Way/U-63, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-1063
RePEc:edi:deuctus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Moussa Diop & Steven P. Lanza & Thomas J. Miceli & C. F. Sirmans, 2010. "Public Use or Abuse? The Use of Eminent Domain for Economic Development in the Era of \textit{Kelo}," Working papers 2010-28, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  2. Steven P. Lanza, 2004. "The Economics of Ethics: The Cost of Political Corruption," CCEA Studies 2004-01, University of Connecticut, Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis.

Articles

  1. Steven P. Lanza & Steven P. Lanza, 2014. "The Price Connecticut Pays for Policy Uncertainty," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  2. Steven P. Lanza, 2013. "Connecticut Housing: Variety Adds Some Spice to Price," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  3. Steven P. Lanza, 2013. "A Manufacturing Report Card: Does Connecticut Make the Grade?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  4. Steven P. Lanza, 2013. "Is Connecticut Master of Its Own Economic Fate?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  5. Steven P. Lanza & Thomas J. Miceli & C. F. Sirmans & Moussa Diop, 2013. "The Use of Eminent Domain for Economic Development in the Era of Kelo," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 27(4), pages 352-362, November.
  6. Steven P. Lanza, 2013. "Targeting Gun Violence: Can We Reduce Gun Deaths and Lot Lose Jobs?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  7. Steven P. Lanza, 2012. "Connecticut: A Command Post for Corporate HQs," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  8. Steven P. Lanza, 2012. "As Good as it Gets?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  9. Steven P. Lanza, 2012. "Connecticut’s Delicate Balance Between Tax Growth and Volatility," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  10. Steven P. Lanza, 2012. "Shared Work; Shared Sacrifices: An Rx for Unemployment?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  11. Steven P. Lanza, 2011. "Taxing Times," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  12. Steven P. Lanza, 2011. "Making the Best of Calamity," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  13. Steven P. Lanza, 2011. "Community Colleges," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  14. Steven P. Lanza, 2011. "Economic Regulation of Business," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  15. Steven P. Lanza, 2010. "Shining a Light on Connecticut's Shadow Jobs," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  16. Steven P. Lanza, 2010. "Zoning in on Minimum Lot Sizes," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  17. Steven P. Lanza, 2010. "Bouncing Back: Explaining the Ability to Recover from Recession in Connecticut and Other States," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  18. Steven P. Lanza, 2010. "Take Me Out to the Ballgame," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  19. Steven P. Lanza, 2009. "Financial Meltdown: How Toxic the Fallout in Connecticut?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  20. Steven P. Lanza, 2009. "Keynes Rules: Human and Public Capital Spending to the Rescue," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  21. Steven P. Lanza, 2009. "How Big a Hangover from the Stock and Housing Benders?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  22. Steven P. Lanza & Bryan Murphy, 2009. "Commuter Rail: Is Connecticut on the Right Track?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  23. Steven P. Lanza, 2008. "Town Government: Is Bigger Better, or Is Small Beautiful?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  24. Steven P. Lanza, 2008. "Spill-Free Gaming: Connecticut's Casinos Generate Few Adverse Spillover Effects," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  25. Steven P. Lanza, 2008. "Tax Reform: Should We Cap Property Taxes or Hang our Hats on Other Options?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  26. Steven P. Lanza, 2008. "Connecticut at the Median: Are You Better Off?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  27. Steven P. Lanza, 2007. "Fairfield County: Bottleneck or Gateway?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  28. Steven P. Lanza, 2007. "Where in the World Is Fairfield County?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  29. Steven P. Lanza, 2007. "Beacons of Light for Connecticut's Cities?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  30. Steven P. Lanza, 2007. "Keeping Noses to the Grindstone," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  31. Steven P. Lanza, 2006. "Nutmeggers Get Down to Small Business," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  32. Steven P. Lanza, 2006. "Way to Grow: Jobs vs. Per-Capita Output," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  33. Steven P. Lanza, 2006. "Connecticut: A State of the Arts?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  34. Steven P. Lanza, 2006. "An Offer You Can't Refuse: Why Do Connecticut and Other States Use Eminent Domain?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  35. Steven P. Lanza, 2005. "Plumbing Connecticut's Brain Drain," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  36. Steven P. Lanza, 2005. "Keeping Connecticut Honest: What Type of Reform is Really Needed?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  37. Steven P. Lanza, 2005. "Connecticut Puts its Stock in High-Risk, High-Return Ventures," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  38. Steven P. Lanza, 2004. "Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks: Does Job Retraining Work? Is it Worth the Cost?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  39. Steven P. Lanza, 2004. "Connecticut's Health Sector: What's the Prognosis?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  40. Steven P. Lanza, 2004. "Connecticut Job Losses: Our Share of National Effects? Or Are We Shifting for Ourselves?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  41. Steven P. Lanza, 2004. "The Economics of Ethics: The Cost of Political Corruption," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  42. Steven P. Lanza, 2003. "Homing In on Connecticut Housing Affordability," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  43. Steven P. Lanza, 2003. "Sectoral Sources of Connecticut Job Growth," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  44. Steven P. Lanza, 2003. "Energy Price Spikes Siphon High-Octane Fuel from State's Economy," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  45. Steven P. Lanza, 2003. "Ten Years of the Connecticut Economy," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  46. Steven P. Lanza, 2002. "Making Municipal Ends Meet: Do It Yourself or Hire a Pro?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  47. Steven P. Lanza, 2002. "In Connecticut’s Service Economy Recession, the Commodity Sector Have Got the Goods," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  48. Steven P. Lanza, 2002. "Older, Wiser, and Better Schooled Than Ever," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  49. Steven P. Lanza, 2002. "Making Cents of Civics," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  50. Steven P. Lanza, 2001. "Energy Costs Send Consumer Prices Skyward," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  51. Steven P. Lanza, 2001. "Connecticut Loves Open Space - If It's Accessible," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  52. Steven P. Lanza, 2001. "The Ups and Downs of the Connecticut Income Tax," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  53. Steven P. Lanza, 2001. "Housing Affordability Returns, But at a Price," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  54. Steven P. Lanza, 2000. "Prices, 1980s Style," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.
  55. Steven P. Lanza, 2000. "Fueled by High Prices, Connecticut Leads in Energy Efficiency," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.
  56. Steven P. Lanza, 2000. "Connecticut Home Prices Now More Affordable," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.
  57. Steven P. Lanza, 2000. "New Economy - Old Price Index," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.
  58. Steven P. Lanza, 2000. "Riding Fairfield County's Income Coattails," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Spring.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Steven P. Lanza & Thomas J. Miceli & C. F. Sirmans & Moussa Diop, 2013. "The Use of Eminent Domain for Economic Development in the Era of Kelo," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 27(4), pages 352-362, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Iljoong & Park, Sungkyu, 2018. "Private takings: Empirical evidence of post-taking performance," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 25-32.
    2. Paul F. Byrne, 2017. "Have Post-Kelo Restrictions on Eminent Domain Influenced State Economic Development?," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 31(1), pages 81-91, February.

  2. Steven P. Lanza, 2013. "Targeting Gun Violence: Can We Reduce Gun Deaths and Lot Lose Jobs?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Summer.

    Cited by:

    1. Jurgen Brauer & Daniel Montolio & Elisa Trujillo, 2014. "Do U.S. State Firearms Laws Affect Firearms Manufacturing Location?," SADO - Working Papers 20, Small Arms Data Observatory.

  3. Steven P. Lanza, 2010. "Bouncing Back: Explaining the Ability to Recover from Recession in Connecticut and Other States," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.

    Cited by:

    1. Randall Jackson & Mulugeta Kahsai & Peter Schaeffer & Mark Middleton & Junbo Yu, 2015. "A Framework for Measuring County Economic Resilience," Working Papers Working Paper 2015-03, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University.

  4. Steven P. Lanza, 2006. "An Offer You Can't Refuse: Why Do Connecticut and Other States Use Eminent Domain?," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.

    Cited by:

    1. Adanu, Kwami & Hoehn, John P. & Norris, Patricia & Iglesias, Emma, 2012. "Voter decisions on eminent domain and police power reforms," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 187-194.

  5. Steven P. Lanza, 2003. "Sectoral Sources of Connecticut Job Growth," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Winter.

    Cited by:

    1. Sverker C. Jagers & Marina Povitkina & Martin Sjöstedt & Aksel Sundström, 2016. "Paradise Islands? Island States and Environmental Performance," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-24, March.
    2. Alan Pilkington & Romano Dyerson, 2004. "Incumbency And The Disruptive Regulator: The Case Of Electric Vehicles In California," International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 8(04), pages 339-354.

  6. Steven P. Lanza, 2000. "Connecticut Home Prices Now More Affordable," The Connecticut Economy, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, issue Fall.

    Cited by:

    1. -, 2015. "Gender Equality Observatory for Latin America and the Caribbean. Annual report 2013-2014. Confronting violence against women in Latin America and the Caribbean," Observatorio de Igualdad de Género en América Latina y el Caribe. Estudios, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 37271 edited by Cepal, December.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Rankings

This author is among the top 5% authors according to these criteria:
  1. Number of Distinct Works, Weighted by Number of Authors

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2010-11-20

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