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Michael King

Not to be confused with: Michael R. King

Personal Details

First Name:Michael
Middle Name:
Last Name:King
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pki289
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.michaelking.ie

Affiliation

(in no particular order)

Trinity Research in Social Studies (TRiSS)
Trinity College Dublin

Dublin, Ireland
http://www.tcd.ie/triss/
RePEc:edi:cetcdie (more details at EDIRC)

Department of Economics
Trinity College Dublin

Dublin, Ireland
http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/
RePEc:edi:detcdie (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers

Working papers

  1. Shane Byrne & Kenneth Devine & Michael King & Yvonne McCarthy & Christopher Palmer, 2023. "The Last Mile of Monetary Policy: Inattention, Reminders, and the Refinancing Channel," NBER Working Papers 31043, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Michael King, 2013. "Green Growth and Poverty Reduction: Policy Coherence for Pro-poor Growth," OECD Development Co-operation Working Papers 14, OECD Publishing.
  3. Michael King, 2012. "Is Mobile Banking Breaking the Tyranny of Distance to Bank Infrastructure? Evidence from Kenya," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp412, IIIS.
  4. Michael King, 2012. "The Unbanked Four-Fifths: Informality and Barriers to Financial Services in Nigeria," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp411, IIIS.
  5. Michael King & Frank Barry & Alan Matthews, 2010. "Policy Coherence for Development: Five Challenges," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp335, IIIS, revised Aug 2010.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Shane Byrne & Kenneth Devine & Michael King & Yvonne McCarthy & Christopher Palmer, 2023. "The Last Mile of Monetary Policy: Inattention, Reminders, and the Refinancing Channel," NBER Working Papers 31043, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Papadopoulos, Alexandros & McGowan, Féidhlim & McGinnity, Frances & Timmons, Shane & Lunn, Pete, 2023. "Switching activity in retail financial markets in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS161, August.

  2. Michael King, 2012. "Is Mobile Banking Breaking the Tyranny of Distance to Bank Infrastructure? Evidence from Kenya," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp412, IIIS.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael King, 2012. "The Unbanked Four-Fifths: Informality and Barriers to Financial Services in Nigeria," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp411, IIIS.
    2. Saibal Ghosh, 2020. "Financial Inclusion in India: Does Distance Matter?," South Asia Economic Journal, Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka, vol. 21(2), pages 216-238, September.
    3. Eliud Dismas Moyi, 2019. "The effect of mobile technology on self-employment in Kenya," Journal of Global Entrepreneurship Research, Springer;UNESCO Chair in Entrepreneurship, vol. 9(1), pages 1-13, December.
    4. Daniel Kipkirong Tarus & Emmanuel Kiptanui Sitienei, 2015. "Intellectual capital and innovativeness in software development firms: the moderating role of firm size," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1-2), pages 48-65, January.
    5. Castells-Quintana, David & Lopez-Uribe, Maria del Pilar & McDermott, Thomas K.J., 2018. "Adaptation to climate change: A review through a development economics lens," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 183-196.
    6. Castells-Quintana, David & del Pilar Lopez-Uribe, Maria & McDermott, Thomas K.J., 2018. "A review of adaptation to climate change through a development economics lens," Working Papers 309605, National University of Ireland, Galway, Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit.

  3. Michael King, 2012. "The Unbanked Four-Fifths: Informality and Barriers to Financial Services in Nigeria," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp411, IIIS.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael King, 2012. "Is Mobile Banking Breaking the Tyranny of Distance to Bank Infrastructure? Evidence from Kenya," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp412, IIIS.
    2. Gloria K. Q. Agyapong, 2015. "Sustainability of Microfinance in Ghana: A Theoretical Perspective," Journal of Empirical Economics, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 4(3), pages 127-137.

  4. Michael King & Frank Barry & Alan Matthews, 2010. "Policy Coherence for Development: Five Challenges," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp335, IIIS, revised Aug 2010.

    Cited by:

    1. Matt Andrews & Nick Fanning, 2015. "Mapping Peer Learning Initiatives in Public Sector Reforms in Development," CID Working Papers 298, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    2. Dirk†Jan Koch, 2018. "Measuring long†term trends in policy coherence for development," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 36(1), pages 87-110, January.
    3. Antonio Sianes & Manuel Dorado-Moreno & César Hervás-Martínez, 2014. "Rating the Rich: An Ordinal Classification to Determine Which Rich Countries are Helping Poorer Ones the Most," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(1), pages 47-65, March.
    4. Joyce, Corona, 2014. "Annual Policy Report on Migration and Asylum 2012: Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number SUSTAT52, August.
    5. Omar A. Guerrero & Gonzalo Castañeda, 2021. "Quantifying the coherence of development policy priorities," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 39(2), pages 155-180, March.
    6. Fogarassy, Csaba & Horvath, Balint & Kovacs, Attila, 2015. "Cross-sector analysis of the Hungarian sectors covered by the Effort Sharing Decision – Climate policy perspectives for the Hungarian agriculture within the 2021-2030 EU programming period," APSTRACT: Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce, AGRIMBA, vol. 9(4), pages 1-8, December.
    7. Omar A. Guerrero & Gonzalo Casta~neda, 2019. "Quantifying the Coherence of Development Policy Priorities," Papers 1902.00430, arXiv.org.
    8. Siemen Berkum & Ruerd Ruben, 2021. "Exploring a food system index for understanding food system transformation processes," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 13(5), pages 1179-1191, October.
    9. Alfredo C. Robles, 2014. "EU Trade in Financial Services with ASEAN, Policy Coherence for Development and Financial Crisis," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(6), pages 1324-1341, November.
    10. Matti Ylönen & Anna Salmivaara, 2021. "Policy coherence across Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals: Lessons from Finland," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 39(5), pages 829-847, September.
    11. Heiner Janus & Stephan Klingebiel & Sebastian Paulo, 2015. "Beyond Aid: A Conceptual Perspective on the Transformation of Development Cooperation," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 155-169, March.
    12. Sari, Dwi Amalia & Margules, Chris & Lim, Han She & Widyatmaka, Febrio & Sayer, Jeffrey & Dale, Allan & Macgregor, Colin, 2021. "Evaluating policy coherence: A case study of peatland forests on the Kampar Peninsula landscape, Indonesia," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 105(C).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2013-12-29
  2. NEP-BAN: Banking (1) 2023-04-10
  3. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2023-04-10
  4. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2023-04-10
  5. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2013-12-29
  6. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2013-12-29
  7. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2023-04-10
  8. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2013-12-29
  9. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (1) 2023-04-10
  10. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2023-04-10

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