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Sergey Gelman

Personal Details

First Name:Sergey
Middle Name:
Last Name:Gelman
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RePEc Short-ID:pge207
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Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Carsten Burhop & Sergey Gelman, 2011. "Liquidity measures, liquidity drivers and expected returns on an early call auction market," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2011_19, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.

Articles

  1. Gelman, Sergey & Wilfling, Bernd, 2009. "Markov-switching in target stocks during takeover bids," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 745-758, December.
  2. Gelman, Sergey & Burhop, Carsten, 2008. "Taxation, regulation and the information efficiency of the Berlin stock exchange, 1892–1913," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 39-66, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Carsten Burhop & Sergey Gelman, 2011. "Liquidity measures, liquidity drivers and expected returns on an early call auction market," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2011_19, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Buchner & Tobias A. Jopp, 2019. "Full steam ahead: Insider knowledge, stock trading and the nationalization of the railways in Prussia around 1879," Working Papers 0151, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Martin T. Bohl & Alexander Pütz & Pierre L. Siklos & Christoph Sulewski, 2018. "Information Transmission under Increasing Political Tension – Evidence for the Berlin Produce Exchange 1887-1896," CQE Working Papers 7618, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
    3. Pierre-Cyrille Hautcoeur & Amir Rezaee & Angelo Riva, 2018. "Competition among Securities Markets," Working Papers halshs-01863942, HAL.
    4. Martin T. Bohl & Alexander Pütz & Pierre L. Siklos & Christoph Sulewski, 2021. "Information transmission under increasing political tensions—Evidence from the Berlin Produce Exchange 1887–1896," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 41(2), pages 226-244, February.

Articles

  1. Gelman, Sergey & Wilfling, Bernd, 2009. "Markov-switching in target stocks during takeover bids," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 745-758, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Luca De Angelis & Leonard J. Paas, 2013. "A dynamic analysis of stock markets using a hidden Markov model," Journal of Applied Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(8), pages 1682-1700, August.
    2. Lien Duong, 2013. "Aggregate Australian Takeovers: A Review of Markov Regime Switching Models," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 529-558, December.
    3. Gerrit Reher & Bernd Wilfling, 2016. "A nesting framework for Markov-switching GARCH modelling with an application to the German stock market," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 411-426, March.
    4. Meulemann, Max & Uebele, Martin & Wilfling, Bernd, 2014. "The restoration of the gold standard after the US Civil War: A volatility analysis," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 37-46.
    5. Chunming Yuan, 2008. "Forecasting Exchange Rates: The Multi-State Markov-Switching Model with Smoothing," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 09-115, UMBC Department of Economics, revised 01 Nov 2009.
    6. Juan M. Lozada & Lina M. Cortés & Daniel Velasquez Gaviria, 2020. "The Stock Market Reaction to Mergers and Acquisitions: Evidence from the Banking Industry," Documentos de Trabajo CIEF 017936, Universidad EAFIT.
    7. Al-Anaswah, Nael & Wilfling, Bernd, 2011. "Identification of speculative bubbles using state-space models with Markov-switching," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 1073-1086, May.
    8. Carroll, Rachael & Kearney, Colm, 2015. "Testing the mixture of distributions hypothesis on target stocks," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 1-14.

  2. Gelman, Sergey & Burhop, Carsten, 2008. "Taxation, regulation and the information efficiency of the Berlin stock exchange, 1892–1913," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 39-66, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Buchner & Tobias A. Jopp, 2019. "Full steam ahead: Insider knowledge, stock trading and the nationalization of the railways in Prussia around 1879," Working Papers 0151, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Turner, John D., 2014. "Financial history and financial economics," QUCEH Working Paper Series 14-03, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    3. Sebastian A.J. Keibek, 2016. "Using probate data to determine historical male occupational structures," Working Papers 26, Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Cambridge, revised 21 Mar 2017.
    4. Alexander Opitz, 2018. "“Comrades, Let's March!”.† The Revolution of 1905 and its impact on financial markets," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 28-52.
    5. David Chambers & Carsten Burhop & Brian Cheffins, 2016. "The Rise and Fall of the German Stock Market, 1870-1938," Working Papers 25, Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Cambridge, revised 21 Sep 2016.
    6. Carsten Burhop, 2011. "The Underpricing of Initial Public Offerings at the Berlin Stock Exchange, 1870–96," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(1), pages 11-32, February.
    7. Buchner, Michael, 2018. "The Berlin Bourse in the London mirror: An asymmetric comparison of microstructures and the role of Germany's large banks in securities trading, c. 1860-1914," IBF Paper Series 01-18, IBF – Institut für Bank- und Finanzgeschichte / Institute for Banking and Financial History, Frankfurt am Main.
    8. Sibylle H. Lehmann, 2014. "Taking firms to the stock market: IPOs and the importance of large banks in imperial Germany, 1896–1913," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(1), pages 92-122, February.
    9. Carsten Burhop & Sibylle Lehmann-Hasemeyer, 2016. "The Berlin stock exchange and the geography of German stock markets in 1913," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(4), pages 429-451.
    10. Allen, Franklin, et al., 2010. "How Important Historically Were Financial Systems for Growth in the U.K., U.S., Germany, and Japan?," Working Papers 10-27, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Weiss Center.
    11. Sibylle Lehmann, 2011. "Taking Firms to the Stock Market: IPOs and the Importance of Universal Banks in Imperial Germany 1896-1913," Cologne Economic History papers 9, University of Cologne, Department of Economic and Business History, revised Mar 2011.
    12. Sibylle Lehmann-Hasemeyer & Jochen Streb, 2016. "The Berlin Stock Exchange in Imperial Germany: A Market for New Technology?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(11), pages 3558-3576, November.
    13. Opitz, Alexander, 2015. "Democratic prospects in Imperial Russia: The revolution of 1905 and the political stock market," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 15-2015, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    14. Jens Günther, 2017. "Capital market effects around dividend announcements: an analysis of the Berlin stock exchange in 1895," Accounting History Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 249-278, September.
    15. Sibylle Lehmann, 2010. "Explaining the performance of Initial Public Offerings in Imperial Germany, 1897-1914: the role of reputation," Working Papers 10005, Economic History Society.
    16. Lehmann, Sibylle H. & Hauber, Philipp & Opitz, Alexander, 2012. "Political rights, taxation, and firm valuation: Evidence from Saxony around 1900," FZID Discussion Papers 59-2012, University of Hohenheim, Center for Research on Innovation and Services (FZID).
    17. Thorsten Lübbers, 2009. "Is Cartelisation Profitable? A Case Study of the Rhenish Westphalian Coal Syndicate, 1893-1913," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2009_09, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    18. Lübbers, Thorsten, 2008. "Shareholder value mining: Wealth effects of takeovers in German coal mining, 1896-1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 462-476, September.

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