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Svenn Jensen

Personal Details

First Name:Svenn
Middle Name:
Last Name:Jensen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pje183
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://svennjensen.strikingly.com

Affiliation

Handelshøyskolen ved HiOA
Høgskolen i Oslo og Akershus

Oslo, Norway
http://www.hioa.no/About-HiOA/Faculty-of-Social-Sciences/OEA

:


RePEc:edi:ohioano (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Michael Hoel & Svenn Jensen, 2010. "Cutting Costs of Catching Carbon - Intertemporal Effects under Imperfect Climate Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3284, CESifo Group Munich.

Articles

  1. Svenn Jensens & Kristina Mohlin & Karen Pittel & Thomas Sterner, 2015. "An Introduction to the Green Paradox: The Unintended Consequences of Climate Policies," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 246-265.
  2. Jensen, Svenn & Traeger, Christian P., 2014. "Optimal climate change mitigation under long-term growth uncertainty: Stochastic integrated assessment and analytic findings," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 104-125.
  3. Hoel, Michael & Jensen, Svenn, 2012. "Cutting costs of catching carbon—Intertemporal effects under imperfect climate policy," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 680-695.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Michael Hoel & Svenn Jensen, 2010. "Cutting Costs of Catching Carbon - Intertemporal Effects under Imperfect Climate Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3284, CESifo Group Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Pfeiffer, 2017. "Fossil Resources and Climate Change – The Green Paradox and Resource Market Power Revisited in General Equilibrium," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 77, March.
    2. Matthias Kalkuhl & Ottmar Edenhofer & Kai Lessmann, 2015. "The Role of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Policies for Climate Change Mitigation," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 60(1), pages 55-80, January.
    3. Niko Jaakkola, 2013. "Monopolistic Sequestration of European Carbon Emissions," OxCarre Working Papers 098, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    4. Pittel, Karen & Röpke, Luise, 2014. "The Implications of Energy Input Flexibility for a Resource Dependent Economy," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100321, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Rübbelke, Dirk & Vögele, Stefan, 2013. "Effects of carbon dioxide capture and storage in Germany on European electricity exchange and welfare," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 582-588.
    6. Grimaud, André & Rouge, Luc, 2014. "Carbon sequestration, economic policies and growth," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 307-331.
    7. Hendrik Ritter & Mark Schopf, 2013. "Unilateral Climate Policy: Harmful or even Disastrous?," Working Papers CIE 62, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
    8. Christian Beermann, 2015. "Climate Policy and the Intertemporal Supply of Fossil Resources," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 62, March.
    9. Walsh, D.M. & O'Sullivan, K. & Lee, W.T. & Devine, M.T., 2014. "When to invest in carbon capture and storage technology: A mathematical model," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 219-225.
    10. Daniel Nachtigall & Dirk Rübbelke, 2013. "The Green Paradox and Learning-by-doing in the Renewable Energy Sector," Working Papers 2013-09, BC3.
    11. van der Werf, Edwin & Di Maria, Corrado, 2012. "Imperfect Environmental Policy and Polluting Emissions: The Green Paradox and Beyond," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 6(2), pages 153-194, March.
    12. Darko Jus & Volker Meier, 2012. "Announcing is Bad, Delaying is Worse: Another Pitfall in Well-Intended Climate Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3844, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. Marc GRONWALD & Ngo Van LONG & Luise ROEPKE, 2017. "Three Degrees of Green Paradox: The Weak, The Strong, and the Extreme Green Paradox," Cahiers de recherche 02-2017, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
    14. Hoel, Michael, 2011. "The supply side of CO2 with country heterogeneity," Memorandum 08/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    15. Marc Gronwald & Ngo Long & Luise Roepke, 2017. "Simultaneous Supplies of Dirty Energy and Capacity Constrained Clean Energy: Is There a Green Paradox?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 68(1), pages 47-64, September.
    16. Edwin van der Werf & Corrado Di Maria, 2011. "Unintended Detrimental Effects of Environmental Policy: The Green Paradox and Beyond," CESifo Working Paper Series 3466, CESifo Group Munich.
    17. Arne Steinkraus, 2016. "Subsidizing Human Capital to Overcome the Green Paradox¡ªA Demand-Side Approach," Journal of Management and Sustainability, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 6(4), pages 1-8, December.
    18. Mark Schopf, 2013. "Preserving Eastern or Offshore Oil for Preventing Green Paradoxes?," Working Papers CIE 63, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
    19. Kollenbach, Gilbert, 2015. "Abatement, R&D and growth with a pollution ceiling," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-16.
    20. Durmaz, Tunç & Schroyen, Fred, 2013. "Evaluating Carbon Capture and Storage in a Climate Model with Directed Technical Change," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 14/2013, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    21. Steinkraus, Arne, 2016. "Subsidizing human capital to overcome the green paradox: A demand-side approach," Economics Department Working Paper Series 17, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Economics Department.

Articles

  1. Svenn Jensens & Kristina Mohlin & Karen Pittel & Thomas Sterner, 2015. "An Introduction to the Green Paradox: The Unintended Consequences of Climate Policies," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 246-265.

    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Pfeiffer, 2017. "Fossil Resources and Climate Change – The Green Paradox and Resource Market Power Revisited in General Equilibrium," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 77, March.
    2. Halvor Briseid Storrøsten, 2017. "Regulation in the presence of adjustment costs and resource scarcity. Transition dynamics and intertemporal effects," Discussion Papers 864, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Cathrine Hagem & Halvor Briseid Storrøsten, 2016. "Supply versus demand-side policies in the presence of carbon leakage and the green paradox," Discussion Papers 836, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. Ngo Van Long, 2015. "The Green Paradox in Open Economies: Lessons from Static and Dynamic Models," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 266-284.
    5. Stefano Bosi & David Desmarchelier, 2017. "Natural cycles and pollution," Working Papers 2017.02, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    6. Fischer, Carolyn & Salant, Stephen W., 2017. "Balancing the carbon budget for oil: The distributive effects of alternative policies," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 191-215.
    7. Elizabeth Baldwin, Yongyang Cai, Karlygash Kuralbayeva, 2018. "To build or not to build? Capital stocks and climate policy," GRI Working Papers 290, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    8. Marc GRONWALD & Ngo Van LONG & Luise ROEPKE, 2017. "Three Degrees of Green Paradox: The Weak, The Strong, and the Extreme Green Paradox," Cahiers de recherche 02-2017, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
    9. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2015. "Introductory Comment–The Green Paradox: A Supply-Side View of the Climate Problem," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 239-245.
    10. Frederick van der Ploeg & Cees Withagen, 2015. "Global Warming and the Green Paradox: A Review of Adverse Effects of Climate Policies," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 285-303.
    11. Marc Gronwald & Ngo Long & Luise Roepke, 2017. "Simultaneous Supplies of Dirty Energy and Capacity Constrained Clean Energy: Is There a Green Paradox?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 68(1), pages 47-64, September.
    12. Helene Naegele & Aleksandar Zaklan, 2017. "Does the EU ETS Cause Carbon Leakage in European Manufacturing?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1689, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    13. Boyce, James K., 2018. "Carbon Pricing: Effectiveness and Equity," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 52-61.
    14. Waldemar Marz & Johannes Pfeiffer, 2015. "Petrodollar Recycling, Oil Monopoly, and Carbon Taxes," ifo Working Paper Series 204, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    15. Orlov, Anton, 2016. "Effects of higher domestic gas prices in Russia on the European gas market: A game theoretical Hotelling model," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 188-199.
    16. Marie-Catherine Riekhof & Johannes Bröcker, 2017. "Does The Adverse Announcement Effect Of Climate Policy Matter? — A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 8(02), pages 1-34, May.

  2. Jensen, Svenn & Traeger, Christian P., 2014. "Optimal climate change mitigation under long-term growth uncertainty: Stochastic integrated assessment and analytic findings," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 104-125.

    Cited by:

    1. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Karel Janda & David Zilberman, 2015. "Selective reporting and the social cost of carbon," CAMA Working Papers 2015-28, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Richard S. J. Tol, 2015. "Economic impacts of climate change," Working Paper Series 7515, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    3. van den Bijgaart, Inge & Gerlagh, Reyer & Liski, Matti, 2016. "A simple formula for the social cost of carbon," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 75-94.
    4. Mark C. Freeman & Gernot Wagner & Richard J. Zeckhauser, 2015. "Climate Sensitivity Uncertainty: When is Good News Bad?," NBER Working Papers 20900, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Mariia Belaia & Michael Funke & Nicole Glanemann, 2017. "Global Warming and a Potential Tipping Point in the Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation: The Role of Risk Aversion," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 67(1), pages 93-125, May.
    6. Kent D. Daniel & Robert B. Litterman & Gernot Wagner, 2016. "Applying Asset Pricing Theory to Calibrate the Price of Climate Risk," NBER Working Papers 22795, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Hjort, Ingrid, 2016. "Potential Climate Risks in Financial Markets: A Literature Overview," Memorandum 01/2016, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    8. Tol, Richard S. J., 2008. "The Economic Impact of Climate Change," Papers WP255, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Dietz, Simon & Gollier, Christian & Kessler, Louise, 2018. "The climate beta," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 258-274.
    10. Brock, W. & Xepapadeas, A., 2016. "Climate Change Policy under Polar Amplification," MITP: Mitigation, Innovation and Transformation Pathways 232717, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    11. Lemoine, Derek & Traeger, Christian P., 2016. "Ambiguous tipping points," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PB), pages 5-18.
    12. Drupp, Moritz A. & Hänsel, Martin C., 2018. "Relative prices and climate policy: How the scarcity of non-market goods drives policy evaluation," Economics Working Papers 2018-01, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    13. Adler, Matthew D. & Treich, Nicolas, 2017. "Utilitarianism, prioritarianism, and intergenerational equity: A cake eating model," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 94-102.
    14. Christian Traeger, 2015. "Closed-Form Integrated Assessment and Uncertainty," CESifo Working Paper Series 5464, CESifo Group Munich.
    15. Armon Rezai & Frederick van der Ploeg, 2015. "Intergenerational Inequality Aversion, Growth and the Role of Damages; Occam's rule for the global carbon tax," OxCarre Working Papers 150, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    16. Frederick Van der Ploeg & Armon Rezai, 2016. "Stranded Assets, the Social Cost of Carbon, and Directed Technical Change: Macroeconomic Dynamics of Optimal Climate Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 5787, CESifo Group Munich.
    17. Yongyang Cai & Kenneth L. Judd & Thomas S. Lontzek, 2015. "The Social Cost of Carbon with Economic and Climate Risks," Papers 1504.06909, arXiv.org, revised Apr 2015.
    18. Sheldon, Tamara L., 2017. "Asymmetric effects of the business cycle on carbon dioxide emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 289-297.
    19. Jean-Marc Bourgeon & Margot Hovsepian, 2017. "Green Technology Adoption and the Business Cycle," CESifo Working Paper Series 6485, CESifo Group Munich.
    20. García-León, David, 2016. "Adapting to Climate Change: an Analysis under Uncertainty," EIA: Climate Change: Economic Impacts and Adaptation 232216, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    21. van den Bijgaart, Inge, 2016. "Essays in environmental economics and policy," Other publications TiSEM 298bee2a-cb08-4173-9fe1-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

  3. Hoel, Michael & Jensen, Svenn, 2012. "Cutting costs of catching carbon—Intertemporal effects under imperfect climate policy," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 680-695.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (2) 2010-12-11 2011-01-30. Author is listed
  2. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (2) 2010-12-11 2011-01-30. Author is listed
  3. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (2) 2010-12-11 2011-01-30. Author is listed
  4. NEP-REG: Regulation (1) 2011-01-30. Author is listed

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