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Sai Ding

Personal Details

First Name:Sai
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ding
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pdi165
http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/business/staff/saiding/
Economics, Business School, Adam Smith Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK, G12 8RT
+44(0)141 330 5066

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Adam Smith Business School
University of Glasgow

Glasgow, United Kingdom
http://www.gla.ac.uk/subjects/economics/

0141 330 4618
0141 330 4940
Adam Smith Building, Glasgow G12 8RT
RePEc:edi:dpglauk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. John Knight & Sai Ding and Alessandra Guariglia, 2010. "Investment and financing constraints in China: does working capital management make a difference?," Economics Series Working Papers 521, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. John Knight & Sai Ding and Alessandra Guariglia, 2010. "Does China overinvest? Evidence from a panel of Chinese firms," Economics Series Working Papers 520, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. John Knight & Sai Ding and Alessandra Guariglia, 2010. "Negative investment in China: financing constraints and restructuring versus growth," Economics Series Working Papers 519, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. John Knight & Sai Ding, 2009. "Why does China invest so much?," Economics Series Working Papers 441, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. John Knight & Sai Ding, 2008. "Why has China Grown so Fast? The Role of Structural Change," Economics Series Working Papers 415, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. John Knight & Sai Ding, 2008. "Can the Augmented Solow Model Explain China's Economic Growth? A Cross-Country Panel Data Analysis," Economics Series Working Papers 380, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  7. Sai Ding & John Knight, 2008. "Why has China Grown So Fast? The Role of Physical and Human Capital Formation," Economics Series Working Papers 414, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Sai Ding & Wei Jiang & Puyang Sun, 2016. "Import competition, dynamic resource allocation and productivity dispersion: micro-level evidence from China," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(4), pages 994-1015.
  2. Sai Ding & Alessandra Guariglia & Richard Harris, 2016. "The determinants of productivity in Chinese large and medium-sized industrial firms, 1998–2007," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 131-155, April.
  3. Sai Ding & Puyang Sun & Wei Jiang, 2016. "The Effect of Import Competition on Firm Productivity and Innovation: Does the Distance to Technology Frontier Matter?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(2), pages 197-227, April.
  4. Björn Gustafsson & Ding Sai, 2015. "Mapping and Understanding Ethnic Disparities in Length of Schooling: The Case of the Hui Minority and the Han Majority in Ningxia Autonomous Region, China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 124(2), pages 517-535, November.
  5. Ding, Sai & Guariglia, Alessandra & Knight, John, 2013. "Investment and financing constraints in China: Does working capital management make a difference?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1490-1507.
  6. Sai Ding & John Knight, 2011. "Why has China Grown So Fast? The Role of Physical and Human Capital Formation," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 73(2), pages 141-174, April.
  7. John Knight & Sai Ding, 2010. "Why Does China Invest So Much?," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 9(3), pages 87-117, Fall.
  8. Ding, Sai & Knight, John, 2009. "Can the augmented Solow model explain China's remarkable economic growth? A cross-country panel data analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 432-452, September.

Books

  1. Knight, John & Ding, Sai, 2012. "China's Remarkable Economic Growth," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199698691.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (7) 2008-03-25 2009-08-02 2011-01-03 2011-01-03 2011-01-03 2011-01-16 2011-01-16. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (4) 2008-03-25 2009-08-02 2011-01-16 2011-01-16
  3. NEP-CNA: China (3) 2008-03-25 2009-08-02 2011-01-03
  4. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (2) 2011-01-03 2011-01-16
  5. NEP-CFN: Corporate Finance (1) 2011-01-03
  6. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2011-01-16
  7. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2009-08-02
  8. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2011-01-16

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