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Connecting East Asia : A New Framework for Infrastructure

  • Asian Development Bank
  • World Bank
  • Japan Bank for International Cooperation
Registered author(s):

    Infrastructure development has made a major contribution to East Asia's enviable record on growth and poverty reduction. However, substantial new investments in infrastructure and service delivery improvements will be required to sustain progress in the future, and to address new challenges posed by urbanization, decentralization, and regional integration. At the same time, questions have often been raised about the impact of infrastructure on the environment and local communities, about waste through corruption in public spending and private contracts, and about the appropriate roles of the public and private sectors in infrastructure financing, ownership, and management. These questions are the motivation for this study by the Asian Development Bank, the Japan Bank for International Cooperation, and the World Bank. The three agencies support infrastructure development through project financing and guarantees, as well as by assisting governments to put in place policies to improve public sector performance, and to attract private investment. Each agency will follow its own operational strategy in each country, but it is expected this new framework will enable taking a more coherent and consistent approach. By suggesting a "new framework" for infrastructure development in the region, Connecting East Asia presents an approach that will help avoid costly mistakes, and allow policy makers, development partners, nongovernmental organizations, and the public and private sectors to work together toward the successful provision of infrastructure. The report is organized around three main themes: inclusive development, coordination, and accountability and risk management.

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    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 7267 and published in 2005.
    ISBN: 0-8213-6162-7
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:7267
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    Phone: (202) 477-1234
    Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
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    1. Röller, Lars-Hendrik & Waverman, Leonard, 2000. "Telecommunications Infrastructure And Economic Development: A Simultaneous Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 2399, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Enrique Crousillat, 1998. "Developing International Power Markets in East Asia," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11547, The World Bank.
    3. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Swaroop, Vinaya & Heng-fu, Zou, 1996. "The composition of public expenditure and economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 313-344, April.
    4. Guasch, J. Luis & Kogan, Joseph, 2001. "Inventories in developing countries : levels and determinants - a red flag for competitiveness and growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2552, The World Bank.
    5. Ghazala Mansuri, 2004. "Community-Based and -Driven Development: A Critical Review," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 19(1), pages 1-39.
    6. J. Luis Guasch, 2004. "Granting and Renegotiating Infrastructure Concessions : Doing it Right," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15024.
    7. William Easterly & Sergio Rebelo, 1993. "Fiscal Policy and Economic Growth: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 4499, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Marco Sorge, 2004. "The nature of credit risk in project finance," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    9. Ng, Francis & Yeats, Alexander, 2003. "Major trade trends in East Asia : what are their implications for regional cooperation and growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3084, The World Bank.
    10. Demetriades, Panicos O & Mamuneas, Theofanis P, 2000. "Intertemporal Output and Employment Effects of Public Infrastructure Capital: Evidence from 12 OECD Economics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(465), pages 687-712, July.
    11. Antonio Estache & M.E. Pinglo, 2005. "Are Returns to Private Infrastructure in Developing Countries Consistent with Risks since the Asian Crisis," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/44150, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    12. Kathie Krumm & Homi Kharas, 2004. "East Asia Integrates : A Trade Policy Agenda for Shared Growth," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15038.
    13. Canning, David & Bennathan, Esra, 2000. "The social rate of return on infrastructure investments," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2390, The World Bank.
    14. John Fernald, 1997. "Roads to prosperity? assessing the link between public capital and productivity," International Finance Discussion Papers 592, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    15. César Calderón & Luis Servén, 2005. "The Effects of Infrastructure Development on Growth and Income Distribution," DEGIT Conference Papers c010_056, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    16. Faguet, Jean-Paul, 2004. "Does decentralization increase government responsiveness to local needs?: Evidence from Bolivia," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(3-4), pages 867-893, March.
    17. Ioannis N. Kessides, 2004. "Reforming Infrastructure : Privatization, Regulation, and Competition," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13525.
    18. Yogita Mumssen, 2004. "Output-Based Aid in Cambodia : Private Operators and Local Communities Help Deliver Water to the Poor," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11049, The World Bank.
    19. Mao Xianqiang & Guo Xiurui, 2001. "Improving Air Quality in Chinese Cities by Substituting Natural Gas for Coal: Barriers and Incentive Policies," EEPSEA Research Report rr2001125, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised Dec 2001.
    20. Jing Jin & Chunli Shen & Qian Wang & Heng-fu Zou, 2012. "Decentralization in China," CEMA Working Papers 546, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    21. Estache, Antonio, 2004. "Emerging infrastructure policy issues in developing countries - a survey of the recent economic literature," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3442, The World Bank.
    22. Nigel James Miller & Christopher Tsoukis, 2001. "On the optimality of public capital for long-run economic growth: evidence from panel data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(9), pages 1117-1129.
    23. Fritzen, Scott, 2002. "Growth, inequality and the future of poverty reduction in Vietnam," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 635-657.
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