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The Economics of Trade Unions

Author

Listed:
  • Rees, Albert

Abstract

In this third edition of his highly acclaimed and influential study, Albert Rees updates his material to reflect the major changes in the labor scene occurring during the 1970s and 1980s. New to this edition is a chapter on the decline of private sector unions, and other chapters have been substantially revised. The treatment of the effect of unions on relative wages has been completely recast to reflect the results of recent research. Students of labor economics will find that Rees's well-balanced account provides an excellent, comprehensive view of all aspects of the activities of unions, from their early development and history, through analysis of their sources of power, to the effects of their policies. In the final chapters, Rees broadens his evaluation to survey noneconomic as well as economic aspects of union activity.

Suggested Citation

  • Rees, Albert, 1989. "The Economics of Trade Unions," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226707105, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:bkecon:9780226707105
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Oren M. Levin-Waldman, 1998. "Exploring the Politics of the Minimum Wage," Macroeconomics 9805010, EconWPA.
    2. Peter Cappelli, 2000. "Examining the Incidence of Downsizing and Its Effect on Establishment Performance," NBER Working Papers 7742, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Casey B. Mulligan, 2005. "Public policies as specification errors," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 8(4), pages 902-926, October.
    4. John Pencavel, 2014. "The Changing Size Distribution of U.S. Trade Unions and its Description by Pareto's Distribution," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 67(1), pages 138-170, January.
    5. Scott M. Fuess, Jr., 1991. "The Impact of Safety and Health Legislation on Union Effectiveness," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 417-423, Oct-Dec.
    6. Bradley Ewing & Phanindra Wunnava, 2002. "Union-Nonunion Wage Differentials and Macroeconomic Activity," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0231, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    7. Casey B. Mulligan, 2002. "A Century of Labor-Leisure Distortions," NBER Working Papers 8774, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. S. Dobbelaere, 2003. "Joint Estimation of Price-Cost Margins and Union Bargaining Power for Belgian Manufacturing," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 03/171, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    9. Geraghty, Thomas M. & Wiseman, Thomas, 2011. "Conflict and compromise: Changes in U.S. strike outcomes, 1880 to 1945," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 519-537.
    10. Casey B. Mulligan, 2002. "A Dual Method of Empirically Evaluating Dynamic Competitive Equilibrium Models with Market Distortions, Applied to the Great Depression & World War II," NBER Working Papers 8775, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. John Pencavel, 2009. "How Successful Have Trade Unions Been? A Utility-Based Indicator of Union Well-Being," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 62(2), pages 147-156, January.
    12. Casey B. Mulligan, 2000. "Can Monopoly Unionism Explain Publicly Induced Retirement?," NBER Working Papers 7680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Blanchflower, D. & Crouchley, R. & Estrin, S. & Oswald, A., 1990. "Unemployment And The Demand For Unions," Papers 372, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
    14. Kertesi, Gábor & Köllő, János, 2003. "Ágazati bérkülönbségek Magyarországon, II. rész. Járadékokon való osztozkodás koncentrált ágazatokban, szakszervezeti aktivitás jelenlétében
      [Pay differentials between industries in Hungary, II. Re
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(12), pages 1049-1074.
    15. Chi-Hsin Wu & Chia-Ying Liu, 2010. "Do Trade Unions Deteriorate International Competitiveness? Reconciliation of the Discrepancy Between Theory and Practice," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 38(2), pages 145-155, June.
    16. Kertesi, Gábor & Köllő, János, 2003. "Ágazati bérkülönbségek Magyarországon, I. rész. Az ágazati járadékképződés alternatív modelljei
      [Pay differentials between industries in Hungary. I. The basic models]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(11), pages 923-938.

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