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The Political Economy of Poverty, Equity and Growth: A Comparative Study

Author

Listed:
  • Lal, Deepak

    (University of California, Los Angeles)

  • Myint, H.

    (London School of Economics)

Abstract

This wide-ranging and innovative book synthesises the findings of a major international study of the political economy of poverty, equity, and growth. It is based primarily on analytical economic histories of 21 developing countries from 1950 to 1985, but also takes account of the wider literature on the subject. The authors take an ambitious interdisciplinary approach to identify patterns in the interplay of initial conditions, instiuttions, interests, and ideas which can help to explain the different growth and poverty alleviation outcomes in the Third World. Three different types of poverty are distinguished, based on their causes, and a more nebulous idea of equityin contrast to egalitarianismis shown to have influenced policy. Since growth is found to be the major means of alleviating mass structural poverty, much of the book is concerned with discovering explanations for policies which are found to be the most important influences on the proximate causes of growth. Lal and Mynt also consider the available evidence on the role of direct transferspublic and privatein alleviating destitution and conjunctural poverty. The Political Economy of Poverty, Equity, and Growth develops a novel framework for the comparative analysis of different growth outcomes. This framework distinguishes between the different relative factor endowments of land, labour, and capital, and between the different organizational structures of pesent versus plantation and mining economies. It also differentiates between the polities of 'autonomous' and 'factional' states in the countries studied, breaking the analysis down into further typological subdivisions and providing important new insights into the differing behaviour of economies that are rich in natural resources and those with abundant labour. These insights constitute a richer explanation for the divergent developmental outcomes in East Asia compared with Latin America and Africa. The evidence collated is used to argue for the continuing relevance of the classical liberal viewpoint on public policies for development, and to show why, even so, nationalist ideologies are likely to be adopted and lead to cycles of interventionism and liberalism. The evidence is also used to provide an explanation for the surprising current worldwide Age of Reform.

Suggested Citation

  • Lal, Deepak & Myint, H., 1998. "The Political Economy of Poverty, Equity and Growth: A Comparative Study," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294320.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780198294320
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Brishti Guha, 2005. "Honesty and Intermediation: Corporate Cheating, Auditor Involvement and the Implications for Development," Working Papers 18-2005, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
    2. Hal Hill, 2013. "The Political Economy of Policy Reform: Insights from Southeast Asia," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 30(1), pages 108-130, March.
    3. Roe, Terry L. & Gopinath, Munisamy, 1996. "World Trade Issues And Food Security," Working Papers 14425, University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy.
    4. Brishti Guha, 2005. "The Case of the Errant Executive : Management, Control and Firm Size in Corporate Cheating," Microeconomics Working Papers 22428, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    5. Yifu Lin, Justin & Li, Zhiyun, 2008. "Endogenous Institution Formation under a Catching-up Strategy in Developing Countries1," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4794, The World Bank.
    6. Anne O. Krueger & David Orsmond, 1990. "Impact of Government on Growth and Trade," NBER Working Papers 3545, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Robinson, James A. & Torvik, Ragnar & Verdier, Thierry, 2006. "Political foundations of the resource curse," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 447-468, April.
    8. Roe, Terry L., 1992. "Political Economy of Structural Adjustment: A General Equilibirum- Interest Group Perspective," Bulletins 7467, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
    9. Patrinos, Harry Anthony & Psacharopoulos, George, 2011. "Education : past, present and future global challenges," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5616, The World Bank.
    10. Christopher Bowdler & Adeel Malik, 2005. "Openness and inflaton volatility: Cross-country evidence," Economics Series Working Papers 2005-W14, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    11. Adeel Malik, 2016. "The Political Economy of Macroeconomic Policy in Arab Resource-Rich Economies," Working Papers 1034, Economic Research Forum, revised Aug 2016.
    12. Adeel Malik, 2017. "The Political Economy of Macroeconomic Policy in Arab Resource- Rich Economies," Working Papers 1117, Economic Research Forum, revised 07 Jun 2017.
    13. Charles Meth, 2007. "Sticking to the Facts: Official and Unofficial Stories about Poverty and Unemployment in South Africa," Working Papers 07123, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    14. Christopher Bowdler & Adeel Malik, 2005. "Openness and inflation volatility: Cross-country evidence," Economics Papers 2005-W14, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    15. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 2013. "Achieving Development Success: Strategies and Lessons from the Developing World," WIDER Working Paper Series 027, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    16. Aron, Janine, 2000. "Growth and Institutions: A Review of the Evidence," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 15(1), pages 99-135, February.

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