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Free Markets and Social Justice

Author

Listed:
  • Sunstein, Cass R.

    (University of Chicago Law School)

Abstract

The newest work from one of the most pre-eminent voices writing in the legal/political arena today, this important book presents a new conception of the relationship between free markets and social justice. The work begins with foundations--the appropriate role of existing "preferences," the importance of social norms, the question whether human goods are commensurable, and issues of distributional equity. Continuing with rights, the work shows that markets have only a partial but instrumental role in the protection of rights. The book concludes with a discussion on regulation, developing approaches that would promote both economic and democratic goals, especially in the context of risks to life and health. Free Markets and Social Justice develops seven basic themes during its discussion: the myth of laissez-faire; preference formation and social norms; the contextual character of choice; the importance of fair distribution; the diversity of human goods; how law can shape preferences; and the puzzles of human rationality. As the latest word from an internationally-renowned writer, this work will raise a number of important questions about economic analysis of law in its conventional form.

Suggested Citation

  • Sunstein, Cass R., 1999. "Free Markets and Social Justice," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195102734.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780195102734
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel H. Cole & Peter Z. Grossman, 2002. "The Meaning of Property Rights: Law versus Economics?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(3), pages 317-330.
    2. Kotsadam, Andreas & Jakobsson, Niklas, 2011. "Do laws affect attitudes? An assessment of the Norwegian prostitution law using longitudinal data," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 103-115, June.
    3. Oren Bar-Gill & Chaim Fershtman, 2005. "Public Policy with Endogenous Preferences," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 7(5), pages 841-857, December.
    4. Simon Deakin, 2014. "Labour Law and Inclusive Development," Working Papers wp458, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    5. William Elliott & Monique Constance-Huggins & Hyun-a Song, 2013. "Improving College Progress among Low- to Moderate-Income (LMI) Young Adults: The Role of Assets," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 382-399, December.
    6. Hopkin, Jonathan, 2004. "The problem with party finance : theoretical perspectives on the funding of party politics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 646, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, 2006. "Environmental Morale and Motivation," CREMA Working Paper Series 2006-17, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    8. Jakobsson, Niklas & Kotsadam, Andreas, 2009. "Do attitudes toward gender equality really differ between Norway and Sweden?," Working Papers in Economics 352, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    9. repec:kap:jcopol:v:40:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10603-017-9345-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Bothfeld, Silke, 2008. "Under (Re-) Construction: die Fragmentierung des deutschen Geschlechterregimes durch die neue Familienpolitik," Working papers of the ZeS 01/2008, University of Bremen, Centre for Social Policy Research (ZeS).
    11. Susan Himmelweit, 2002. "Making Visible the Hidden Economy: The Case for Gender-Impact Analysis of Economic Policy," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 49-70.
    12. Everaldo Lamprea M., 2006. "Derechos fundamentales y consecuencias económicas," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 8(14), pages 77-103, January-J.
    13. Argandoña , Antonio, 2002. "Political party funding and business corruption," IESE Research Papers D/458, IESE Business School.
    14. Jonathan Aldred, 2006. "Incommensurability and Monetary Valuation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 82(2), pages 141-161.
    15. Sergey Tretyakov, 2013. "Economic efficiency as a model of the social context of the conceptualization of the law," HSE Working papers WP BRP 11/LAW/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    16. Christopher Marquis & Michael W. Toffel & Yanhua Zhou, 2011. "Scrutiny, Norms, and Selective Disclosure: A Global Study of Greenwashing," Harvard Business School Working Papers 11-115, Harvard Business School, revised Jul 2015.
    17. Jahn, Elke J. & Wagner, Thomas, 2001. "Labour's law?," Discussion Papers 6, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
    18. Peter Cartwright, 2015. "Understanding and Protecting Vulnerable Financial Consumers," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 119-138, June.
    19. J.A. den Hertog, 2010. "Review of economic theories of regulation," Working Papers 10-18, Utrecht School of Economics.
    20. David Sunding, 2014. "Conserving Endangered Species through Regulation of Urban Development: The Case of California Vernal Pools," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 90(2), pages 290-305.

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