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Fiscal Inclusive Development: Microsimulation Models for Latin America

Editor

Listed:
  • Urzúa, Carlos M.
    (Tecnológico de Monterrey)

Abstract

This book presents several microsimulation models that can be used to assess the welfare consequences of a number of policy reforms in five countries: Brazil, Chile, Guatemala, Mexico and Uruguay. By using micro data from national surveys, the models not only characterize the population on the aggregate but also on a number of dimensions such as age, family composition and income level, which are important for distributive analysis. The models also quantify and identify those who win and those who lose with a reform. Furthermore, the open-source nature of the models presented here will help to build-up technical capacities on the subject across Latin America.

Suggested Citation

  • Urzúa, Carlos M. (ed.), 2012. "Fiscal Inclusive Development: Microsimulation Models for Latin America," EGAP Books, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de México, number 201202.
  • Handle: RePEc:ega:libros:201202
    as

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    File URL: http://alejandria.ccm.itesm.mx/egap/documentos/LIB-2012-02.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. François Bourguignon & Amedeo Spadaro, 2006. "Microsimulation as a tool for evaluating redistribution policies," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 4(1), pages 77-106, April.
    2. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Arthur Lewbel, 1997. "Quadratic Engel Curves And Consumer Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 527-539, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Latinoamérica; Brazil; Chile; Guatemala; Mexico; Uruguay; tax system; benefit system; simulation; microsimulation; income distribution; tax progressivity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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