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Women and work: tipplers and teetotalers

Author

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  • John Mullahy

    (University of Wisconsin and NBER, USA)

  • Jody L. Sindelar

    (Yale University and NBER, USA)

Abstract

We seek to understand better the puzzling finding that, for women, alcoholism appears to be positively associated with the probability of being employed. Using the 1988 Alcohol Survey of the National Health Interview Survey, we find that this association holds for white women only. For white women, alcoholism and early drinking are associated with higher educational attainment, a smaller family size and a lower probability of being married. In turn, these human capital indicators are associated with greater labour supply, thus helping to explain the curious positive relationship between alcoholism and employment for women. An advance in this paper over our previous work is to examine life-time abstention from alcohol and its association with employment and human capital variables. We find that lifetime abstention is associated with lower: employment, unemployment and education and greater propensity to be married for both white and non-white women. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • John Mullahy & Jody L. Sindelar, 1997. "Women and work: tipplers and teetotalers," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(5), pages 533-537.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:6:y:1997:i:5:p:533-537
    DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1050(199709)6:5<533::AID-HEC296>3.0.CO;2-F
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael T. French & Edward C. Norton & Hai Fang & Johanna Catherine Maclean, 2010. "Alcohol consumption and body weight," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 814-832.
    2. Cook, Philip J. & Moore, Michael J., 2000. "Alcohol," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 30, pages 1629-1673 Elsevier.
    3. Thomas S. Dee, 2001. "Alcohol abuse and economic conditions: Evidence from repeated cross-sections of individual-level data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(3), pages 257-270.
    4. Ana I. Balsa & Michael T. French, 2010. "Alcohol use and the labor market in Uruguay," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 833-854.
    5. Keng, Shao-Hsun, 1998. "The demand for health, alcohol abuse, and labor market outcomes: a longitudinal study," ISU General Staff Papers 1998010108000012934, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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