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A Combinatorial Optimization Approach to Nonmarket Environmental Benefit Aggregation via Simulated Populations

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Listed:
  • Stephen Hynes
  • Nick Hanley
  • Cathal O’Donoghue

Abstract

This paper considers the use of a "combinatorial optimization" technique in the aggregation of environmental benefit values. Combinatorial optimization is used to statistically match population census data to a contingent valuation survey. The matched survey and census information is then used to produce regional and national total willingness-to-pay figures. These figures are then compared to figures derived using more standard approaches to calculating aggregate environment benefit values. The choice of aggregation approach is shown to have a major impact upon estimates of total benefits at a regional level, especially when the target population displays considerable heterogeneity across space.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Hynes & Nick Hanley & Cathal O’Donoghue, 2010. "A Combinatorial Optimization Approach to Nonmarket Environmental Benefit Aggregation via Simulated Populations," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 86(2), pages 345-362.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:86:y:2010:i:2:p:345-362
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bateman, Ian J. & Day, Brett H. & Georgiou, Stavros & Lake, Iain, 2006. "The aggregation of environmental benefit values: Welfare measures, distance decay and total WTP," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 450-460, December.
    2. David J. Lewis & Andrew J. Plantinga, 2007. "Policies for Habitat Fragmentation: Combining Econometrics with GIS-Based Landscape Simulations," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(2), pages 109-127.
    3. John B. Loomis, 1987. "Expanding Contingent Value Sample Estimates to Aggregate Benefit Estimates: Current Practices and Proposed Solutions," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 63(4), pages 396-402.
    4. Rosenberger, Randall S. & Stanley, Tom D., 2006. "Measurement, generalization, and publication: Sources of error in benefit transfers and their management," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 372-378, December.
    5. P Williamson & M Birkin & P H Rees, 1998. "The estimation of population microdata by using data from small area statistics and samples of anonymised records," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 30(5), pages 785-816, May.
    6. V. Kerry Smith, 1993. "Nonmarket Valuation of Environmental Resources: An Interpretive Appraisal," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 69(1), pages 1-26.
    7. P Williamson & M Birkin & P H Rees, 1998. "The Estimation of Population Microdata by Using Data from Small Area Statistics and Samples of Anonymised Records," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 30(5), pages 785-816, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cathal O'Donoghue & Thia Hennessy, 2014. "Chapter 03: The Agri-Food Sector," Chapters from Rural Economic Development in Ireland,in: Rural Economic Development in Ireland, edition 1, chapter 3 Rural Economy and Development Programme,Teagasc.
    2. Cathal O'Donoghue & Thia Hennessy, 2015. "Policy and Economic Change in the Agri-Food Sector in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 46(2), pages 315-337.
    3. Cathal O'Donoghue & Karyn Morrissey & John Lennon, 2014. "Spatial Microsimulation Modelling: a Review of Applications and Methodological Choices," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 7(1), pages 26-75.
    4. Stephen Hynes & Daniel Norton & Nick Hanley, 2013. "Adjusting for Cultural Differences in International Benefit Transfer," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 56(4), pages 499-519, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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