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Working Hours and Hedonic Wages in the Market Equilibrium


  • Kinoshita, Tomio


In the conventional model of labor supply, working hours are implicitly assumed to be divisible goods, which is an obviously unrealistic assumption. The purpose of this paper is to analyze working hours as indivisible goods. When working hours are indivisible, labors are differentiated in the market by their length, and wages will be a function of working hours. The main conclusions are that (1) in the market equilibrium, the elasticity of the hedo nic wage curve with respect to hourly wage rates must be positive or less than A1 and (2) generally data will reveal neither demand nor su pply structures. Copyright 1987 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Kinoshita, Tomio, 1987. "Working Hours and Hedonic Wages in the Market Equilibrium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(6), pages 1262-1277, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:95:y:1987:i:6:p:1262-77

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Grossman, Sanford J & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1980. "On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 393-408, June.
    2. McCafferty, Stephen & Driskill, Robert, 1980. "Problems of Existence and Uniqueness in Nonlinear Rational Expectations Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(5), pages 1313-1317, July.
    3. Stephen W. Salant, 1974. "Profitable speculation, price stability, and welfare," International Finance Discussion Papers 54, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Danthine, Jean-Pierre, 1978. "Information, futures prices, and stabilizing speculation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 79-98, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eliane El Badaoui & Eric Strobl & Frank Walsh, 2014. "The Impact of Internal Migration on Local Labour Markets in Thailand," Working Papers 2014-71, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    2. Stefan Sebastian Fahrländer, 2006. "Semiparametric Construction of Spatial Generalized Hedonic Models for Private Properties," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(IV), pages 501-528, December.
    3. Hart, Robert A. & Ma, Yue, 2010. "Wage-hours contracts, overtime working and premium pay," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 170-179, January.
    4. PETER McADAM & ALPO WILLMAN, 2013. "Technology, Utilization, and Inflation: What Drives the New Keynesian Phillips Curve?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(8), pages 1547-1579, December.
    5. Senesky, Sarah, 2005. "Testing the intertemporal labor supply model: are jobs important?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(6), pages 749-772, December.
    6. Wolf, Elke, 2001. "Comparing the part-time wage gap in Germany and the Netherlands," ZEW Discussion Papers 01-18, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. John Pencavel, 2016. "Whose Preferences Are Revealed In Hours Of Work?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(1), pages 9-24, January.
    8. McAdam, Peter & Willman, Alpo, 2007. "Phillips-Curve Dynamics: Mark-Up Cyclicality, Effective Hours and Regime-Dependency," Kiel Working Papers 1359, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    9. Terry J. Fitzgerald, 1998. "Work Schedules, Wages and Employment in a General Equilibrium Model with Team Production," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(4), pages 809-834, October.
    10. Strobl, Eric & Walsh, Frank, 2011. "The ambiguous effect of minimum wages on hours," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 218-228, April.
    11. Hart, Robert A. & Ma, Yue, 2013. "Overtime Working and Contract Efficiency," IZA Discussion Papers 7560, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Mark L Bryan, 2007. "Workers, Workplaces and Working Hours," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(4), pages 735-759, December.
    13. Eric Strobl & Frank Walsh, 2007. "The ambiguous effect of minimum wages on workers and total hours," Working Papers 200714, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    14. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-071 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Chung-cheng Lin, 2001. "A Comment on "Labor Markets, Unemployment, and Minimum Wages: A New View."," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 71-82, Winter.
    16. Eva Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau & Jos N. Van Ommeren, 2012. "Start Time and Worker Compensation Implications for Staggered-Hours Programmes," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 46(2), pages 205-220, May.

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