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Workers, Workplaces and Working Hours

  • Mark L Bryan

This article uses the British Workplace Employee Relations Survey 1998 dataset to evaluate the importance of firm-level factors in determining weekly hours of work in Britain, to analyse the amount of variation of hours within firms, and to assess whether workers are sorted into firms on the basis of hours. Nearly a third of the explained variation in weekly hours of work can be ascribed to firm-level differences, which are unrelated to any observed worker characteristics. Firm-level 'policies' are especially important in the private-services sector. A further 40 per cent of variance can be attributed to the effect within firms of different occupation, skills and family characteristics. Finally, about a quarter of the explained variation in working hours is due to a sorting process of workers to firms, especially on the basis of skill and occupation. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2007.

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Article provided by London School of Economics in its journal British Journal of Industrial Relations.

Volume (Year): 45 (2007)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 735-759

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Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:45:y:2007:i:4:p:735-759
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  1. Martijn P. Tummers & Isolde Woittiez, 1991. "A Simultaneous Wage and Labor Supply Model with Hours Restrictions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(3), pages 393-423.
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  8. Abowd, John M. & Kramarz, Francis, 1999. "The analysis of labor markets using matched employer-employee data," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 40, pages 2629-2710 Elsevier.
  9. Joseph Altonji & Christina Paxson, 1990. "Labor Supply, Hours Constraints and Job Mobility," Working Papers 651, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  10. Michael Kremer & Eric Maskin, 1996. "Wage Inequality and Segregation," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1777, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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  13. Weiss, Yoram, 1996. "Synchronization of Work Schedules," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(1), pages 157-79, February.
  14. Stevens, Margaret, 1994. "A Theoretical Model of On-the-Job Training with Imperfect Competition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 537-62, October.
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